San Diego International Beer Festival

June 15-17, 2018

Five Sessions. Hundreds of Beers. One Glass.

Enter Competition

Beer Styles

Our greatly-expanded list of categories are based on the style guidelines published by the Brewers Association. Download the complete list of all 137 styles (pdf).

Beer Styles: Division 1407

1. American Wheat Ale

1A.  Light American Wheat Ale With Yeast

This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent wheat malt, and hop rates may be low to medium. Hop characters may be light to moderate in bitterness, flavor and aroma. Fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Color is usually straw to light amber, and the body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Because this style is served with yeast the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel and appear hazy to very cloudy. Chill haze is also acceptable. Yeast flavor and aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of malt and hops. These beers are typically served with the yeast in the bottle, and are cloudy when served.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.036-1.056 (9-13.8 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.018 (1.5-4.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2.8-4.4% (3.5-5.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10-35
Color SRM (EBC): 4-10 (8-20 EBC)

1B.  Light American Wheat Ale Without Yeast

This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent wheat malt, and hop rates may be low to medium. Hop characters may be light to moderate in bitterness, flavor and aroma. A fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Appearance can be clear or with chill haze, golden to light amber, and the body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Because this style is packaged and served without yeast, no yeast characters should be evident in mouthfeel, flavor, or aroma.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.036-1.050 (9-12.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.004-1.016 (1-4.0 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3-4% (3.8-5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10-35
Color SRM (EBC): 2-10 (4-20 EBC)

1C.  Dark American Wheat Ale With Yeast

This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent malt wheat, and hop rates may be low to medium. Fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels; however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Color is dark amber to dark brown, and the body should be light to medium in character. Roasted malts are optionally evident in aroma and flavor with a low level of roast malt astringency acceptable when appropriately balanced with malt sweetness. Roast malts may be evident as a cocoa/chocolate or caramel character. Aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters may be part of the overall flavor/aroma profile. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Because this style is intended to be served with yeast the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel and appear hazy to very cloudy. Chill haze is acceptable. Yeast flavor and aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of malt and hops.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.036-1.050 (9-12.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.004-1.016 (1-4.0 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3-4% (3.8-5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 25
Color SRM (EBC): 9-22 (18-44 EBC)

1D.  Dark American Wheat Ale Without Yeast

This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent malted wheat, and hop rates may be low to medium. A fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels; however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Color is dark amber to dark brown, and the body should be light to medium in character. Roasted malts are optionally evident in aroma and flavor with a low level of roast malt astringency acceptable when appropriately balanced with malt sweetness. Roast malts may be evident as a cocoa/chocolate or caramel character. Aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters may be part of the overall flavor/aroma profile. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Because this style is packaged and served without yeast, no yeast characters should be evident in mouthfeel, flavor, or aroma. Chill haze is also acceptable.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.036-1.050 (9-12.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.004-1.016 (1-4.0 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3-4% (3.8-5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 25
Color SRM (EBC): 9-22 (18-44 EBC)

2. Fruit & Vegetable Beer

2A. Fruit Beer

Fruit beers are any beers using fruit or fruit extracts as an adjunct in either, the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, fruit qualities. Fruit qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. If a fruit (such as juniper berry) has an herbal or spice quality, it is more appropriate to consider it in the herb and spice beers category. Acidic bacterial (not wild yeast) fermentation characters may be evident (but not necessary) they would contribute to acidity and enhance fruity balance. Clear or hazy beer is acceptable in appearance. A statement by the brewer explaining what fruits are used is essential in order for fair assessment in competitions. If this beer is a classic style with fruit, the brewer should also specify the classic style.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.030-1.110 (7.5-26 oPlato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 2-9.5% (2.5-12%)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5-70
Bitterness (IBU): 5-50 (10-100 EBC)
Color SRM (EBC): 5-50 (10-100 EBC)

2B. Fruit Wheat Ale With or Without Yeast

This beer can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It can be brewed with 30 to 75 percent malted wheat. Fruit or fruit extracts contribute flavor and/or aroma. Perceived fruit qualities should be authentic and replicate true fruit complexity as much as possible. Color should reflect a degree of fruit’s color. Hop rates may be low to medium. Hop characters may be light to moderate in bitterness, flavor and aroma. Fruity-estery aroma and flavor from yeast can be typical but at low levels; however, phenolic, clovelike characteristics should not be perceived. Body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. When this style is served with yeast the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel and appear hazy to very cloudy. Chill haze is also acceptable. Yeast flavor and aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of malt and hops. Brewer may indicate on the bottle whether the yeast should be intentionally roused or if they prefer that the entry be poured as quietly as possible.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.036-1.050 (9-12.5 oPlato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.004-1.016 (1-4.0 oPlato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3-4% (3.8-5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10-35
Color SRM (EBC): 2-10 (4-20 EBC) or color of fruit

2C. Field Beer

Field beers are any beers using vegetables as an adjunct in either the mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, qualities. Vegetable qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. If a vegetable (such as chili pepper) has an herbal or spice quality it should be classified as herb/spice beer category. A statement by the brewer explaining what vegetables are used is essential in order for fair assessment in competitions. If this beer is a classic style with vegetables, the brewer should also specify the classic style.

Note: If no Pumpkin beer category exists in a competition, then Pumpkin beers should be entered in this category.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.030-1.110 (7.5-26 oPlato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006- 1.030 (1.5-7.5 oPlato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2-10.5% (2.5-13.1%)
Bitterness (IBU): 5-70
Color SRM (EBC): 5-50 (10-100 EBC)

2D.  Pumpkin Beer

Pumpkin beers are any beers using pumpkins (Cucurbito pepo) as an adjunct in either mash, kettle, primary or secondary fermentation, providing obvious (ranging from subtle to intense), yet harmonious, qualities. Pumpkin qualities should not be overpowered by hop character. These may or may not be spiced or flavored with other things. A statement by the brewer explaining the nature of the beer is essential for fair assessment in competitions. If this beer is a classic style with pumpkin, the brewer should also specify the classic style.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.030-1.110 (7.5-26 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2-9.5% (2.5-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 5 – 70
Color SRM (EBC): 5-50 (10-100 EBC)

3. Unique Ingredient Beer

3A.  Chocolate/Cocoa-Flavored Beer

Chocolate beers use ―dark chocolate or cocoa in any of its forms other than or in addition to hops to create a distinct (ranging from subtle to intense) character. Under hopping allows chocolate to contribute to the flavor profile while not becoming excessively bitter. White Chocolate should not be entered into this category. If this beer is a classic style with chocolate or cocoa, the brewer should specify the classic style.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.030-1.110 (7.5-26 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2-9.5% (2.5-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 15-40
Color SRM (EBC): 15-50 (30-100 EBC)

3B.  Coffee-Flavored Beer

Coffee beers use coffee in any of its forms other than or in addition to hops to create a distinct (ranging from subtle to intense) character. Under hopping allows coffee to contribute to the flavor profile while not becoming excessively bitter. If this beer is a classic style with coffee flavor, the brewer should specify the classic style.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.030-1.110 (7.5-26 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2-9.5% (2.5-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 15-40
Color SRM (EBC): 8-50 (16-100 EBC)

3C.  Herb & Spice Beer

Herb beers use herbs or spices (derived from roots, seeds, fruits, vegetable, flowers, etc.) other than or in addition to hops to create a distinct (ranging from subtle to intense) character, though individual characters of herbs and/or spices used may not always be identifiable. Under hopping often, but not always, allows the spice or herb to contribute to the flavor profile. Positive evaluations are significantly based on perceived balance of flavors. A statement by the brewer explaining what herbs or spices are used is essential in order for fair assessment in competitions. Specifying a style upon which the beer is based may help evaluation. If this beer is a classic style with an herb or spice, the brewer should specify the classic style. If no Chocolate or Coffee category exists in a competition, then chocolate and coffee beers should be entered in this category.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.030-1.110 (7.5-26 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2-9.5% (2.5-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 5-70
Color SRM (EBC): 5-50 (10-100 EBC)

4. Specialty Beer

4A.  Specialty Beer

These beers are brewed using unusual fermentable sugars, grains and starches that contribute to alcohol content other than, or in addition to, malted barley. Nuts generally have some degree of fermentables and therefore appropriately classified in this category. The distinctive characters of these special ingredients should be evident either in the aroma, flavor or overall balance of the beer, but not necessarily in overpowering quantities. For example, maple syrup or potatoes would be considered unusual. Rice, corn, or wheat are not considered unusual. Special ingredients must be listed when competing. A statement by the brewer explaining the special nature of the beer, ingredient(s) and achieved character is essential in order for fair assessment in competitions. If this beer is a classic style with some specialty ingredient(s), the brewer should also specify the classic style.

Guidelines for competing: Spiced beers using unusual fermentables should be entered in the experimental category. Fruit beers using unusual fermentables should be entered in the fruit beer category.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.030-1.140++ (7.5-40++ °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.030+ (1.5-7.5+°Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2-20% (2.5-25%)
Bitterness (IBU): 0-100
Color SRM (EBC): 1-100 (2-200 EBC)

4B.  Specialty Honey Lager or Ale

These beers are brewed using honey in addition to malted barley. Beers may be brewed to a traditional style or may be experimental. Character of honey should be evident in flavor and aroma and balanced with the other components without overpowering them. A statement by the brewer explaining the classic or other style of the beer, and the type of honey used is essential in order for fair assessment in competitions.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.030-1.110 (7.5-26 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.030 (1.5-7.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2-9.5% (2.5-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 0-100
Color SRM (EBC): 1-100 (2-200 EBC)

4C.  Gluten Free Beer

A beer (lager, ale or other) that is made from fermentable sugars, grains and converted carbohydrates. Ingredients do not contain gluten, in other words zero gluten (No barley, wheat, spelt, oats, rye, etc). May or may not contain malted grains that do not contain gluten. Brewers design and identify these beers along other style guidelines with regard to flavor, aroma and appearance profile. In competitions, brewers identify ingredients and fermentation type.

Note: These guidelines do not supersede any government regulations. Wine, mead, flavored malt beverages or beverages other than beer as defined by the TTB (U.S. Trade and Tax Bureau) are not considered ―gluten-free beer‖ under these guidelines.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): Varies with style

4D.  Experimental Beer

An experimental beer is any beer (lager, ale or other) that is primarily grain-based and employs unusual techniques and/or ingredients. A minimum 51% of the fermentable carbohydrates must be derived from malted grains. The overall uniqueness of the process, ingredients used and creativity should be considered. Beers such as garden (vegetable), fruit, chocolate, coffee, spice, specialty or other beers that match existing categories should not be entered into this category. Beers not easily matched to existing style categories in a competition would often be entered into this category. Beers that are a combination of other categories (spice, smoke, specialty, porter, etc.) could also be entered into this category. A statement by the brewer explaining the experimental or other nature of the beer is essential in order for fair assessment in competitions. Generally, a 25-word statement would suffice in explaining the experimental nature of the beer.

4E.  Other Strong Ale or Lager

Any style of beer can be made stronger than the classic style guidelines. The goal should be to reach a balance between the style’s character and the additional alcohol. Refer to this guide when making styles stronger and appropriately identify the style created (for example: double alt, triple fest, or quadruple Pilsener).

4F.  Session Beer

Any style of beer can be made lower in strength than described in the classic style guidelines. The goal should be to reach a balance between the style’s character and the lower alcohol content. Drinkability is a character in the overall balance of these beers. Beers in this category must not exceed 4.1% alcohol by weight (5.1% alcohol by volume).

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.034-1.040 (8.5-10 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.004-1.010 (1-2.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.2-4.1% (4.0-5.1%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 30
Color SRM (EBC): 2+ (4+ EBC)

5. Rye Beer

5A.  Rye Ale or Lager With or Without Yeast

Rye beers can be made using either ale or lager yeast. It should be brewed with at least 20 percent rye malt, and low to medium perception of hop bitterness. Hop aroma and flavor can be low to medium-high. These are often versions of classic styles that contain noticeable rye character in balance with other qualities of the beer. A spicy, fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels; however, phenolic, clove-like characteristics should not be perceived. Color is straw to amber, and the body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. If this style is packaged and served without yeast, no yeastcharacters should be evident in mouthfeel, flavor, or aroma. A low level of tannin derived astringency may be perceived. If thisstyle is served with yeast, the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel and appear hazy to very cloudy. Yeast flavor and aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of rye and barley malt and hops. Darker versions of this style will be dark amber to dark brown, and the body should be light to medium in character. Roasted malts are optionally evident in aroma and flavor with a low level of roast malt astringency acceptable when appropriately balanced with malt sweetness. Roast malts may be evident as a cocoa/chocolate or caramel character. Aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters may be part of the overall flavor/aroma profile. As in the lighter colored versions, diacetyl should not be perceived. Competition directors may create specific styles of rye beer, such as Rye Pale Ale or Rye Brown Ale. A statement by the brewer indicating if the beer is based on a classic style is essential for accurate judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): Varies with style

5B.  German-Style Rye Ale With or Without Yeast

This beer can be made using phenol producing ale yeast. It should be brewed with at least 30 percent rye malt, and hop rates will be low. A banana –like fruity-estery aroma and flavor are typical but at low levels; phenolic, clove-like characteristics should also be perceived. Color is straw to dark amber, and the body should be light to medium in character. Diacetyl should not be perceived. If this style is packaged and served without yeast, no yeast characters should be evident in mouthfeel, flavor, or aroma. If the beer is served with yeast, the character should portray a full yeasty mouthfeel and appear hazy to very cloudy. Yeast flavor and aroma should be low to medium but not overpowering the balance and character of rye and barley malt and hops. Darker versions of this style will be dark amber to dark brown, and the body should be light to medium in character. Roasted malts are optionally evident in aroma and flavor with a low level of roast malt astringency acceptable when appropriately balanced with malt sweetness. Roast malts may be evident as a cocoa/chocolate or light caramel character. Aromatic toffee-like, caramel, or biscuit-like characters may be part of the overall flavor/aroma profile. As in the lighter colored versions, diacetyl should not be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.047-1.056 (11.8-14 °Plato
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.016 (2-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.9-4.4% (4.9-5.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 15
Color SRM (EBC): 4-25 (8-50 EBC)

6. Hybrid Belgian-Style Ale

6A.  Pale American-Belgo-Style Ale

These beers must portray the unique characters imparted by yeasts typically used in fruity and big Belgian-Style ales – These beers are not traditional Belgian styles which are already defined. They are unique beers unto themselves. Notes of banana, berry, apple, sometimes coriander spice-like and/or smoky-phenolic characters should be portrayed with balance of hops and malt character when fermented with such yeast. Hop aroma, flavor and bitterness not usually found in the base style, can be medium to very high and must show the characters of American hop varieties. Color falls in the blonde to amber range. Esters should be at medium to high levels. Diacetyl should not be evident. Chill haze may be evident. Sulfur-like yeast character should be absent. Beers should be presented without yeast if bottled fermented. A statement by the brewer that could include information such as style being elaborated upon, and other information about the entry with regard to flavor, aroma or appearance, is essential for fair assessment in competitions. Beers with Brettanomyces may be subcategorized under this category.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): 5- 15 (10-30 EBC)

6B.  Dark American-Belgo-Style Ale

These beers must portray the unique characters imparted by yeasts typically used in fruity and big Belgian-Style ales – These beers are not traditional Belgian styles which are already defined. They are unique beers unto themselves. Notes of banana, berry, apple, sometimes coriander spice-like and/or smoky-phenolic characters should be portrayed with balance of hops and malt character when fermented with such yeast. Hop aroma, flavor and bitterness not usually found in the base style, can be medium to very high and must show the characters of American hop varieties. Dark color falls in the deep amber/brown to black range. Roasted malts or barley may have a range of character from subtle to robust, and should be reflected in the overall character and balance of the beer. Esters should be at medium to high levels. Diacetyl should not be evident. Chill haze may be evident. Sulfurlike yeast character should be absent. Beers should be presented without yeast if bottled fermented. A statement by the brewer that could include information such as style being elaborated upon, and other information about the entry with regard to flavor, aroma or appearance, is essential for fair assessment in competitions. Beers with Brettanomyces may be subcategorized under this category.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): 16+ (32+ EBC)

6C.  Other Belgian-Style Ale

Recognizing the uniqueness and traditions of several other styles of Belgian Ales, the beers entered in this category will be assessed on the merits that they do not fit existing style guidelines and information that the brewer provides explaining the history and tradition of the style. Balance of character is a key component when assessing these beers. Barrel or wood-aged entries in competitions may be directed to other categories by competition director. In competitions the brewer must provide the historical or regional tradition of the style, or his interpretation of the style, in order to be assessed properly by the judges.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Range provided by brewer
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Range provided by brewer
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): Range provided by brewer
Bitterness (IBU): Range provided by brewer
Color SRM (EBC): Range provided by brewer

7. Other Sour Beer

7A.  Wood and Barrel Aged Sour

A wood- or barrel-aged sour beer is any lager, ale or hybrid beer, either a traditional style or a unique experimental beer that has been aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood and has developed a bacterial induced natural acidity. This beer is aged in wood with the intention of introducing the micro flora present in the wood. Sometimes wood aging is intended to impart the particularly unique character of the wood, but wood-aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood-flavors. Wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character. Wood-derived character can also be characterized by flavors of the product that was in the barrel during prior use. These wood-derived flavors, if present in this style, can be very low in character and barely perceived or evident or assertive as wood-derived flavors. Any degree of wood derived flavors should be in balance with other beer character. Fruit and herb/spiced versions may take on the hue, flavors and aromas of added ingredients. Usually bacteria and ―wild‖ yeasts fermentation contributes complex esters and results in a dry to very dry beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of acidity, complex esters, and new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Brewers when entering this category should specify type of barrel used and any other special treatment or ingredients used. Competition managers may create style subcategories to differentiate between high alcohol and low alcohol beers and very dark and lighter colored beer as well as for fruit beers and non-fruit beers. Competitions may develop guidelines requesting brewers to specify what kind of wood (new or used oak, other wood varieties). The brewer may be asked to explain the special nature (wood used, base beer style(s) and achieved character) of the beer.

7B.  American Sour

American sour ales can be very light to black or take on the color of added fruits or other ingredients. There is no Brettanomyces character in this style of beer. Wood- and barrel-aged sour ales are classified elsewhere. If acidity is present it is usually in the form of lactic, acetic and other organic acids naturally developed with acidified malt in the mash or in fermentation by the use of various microorganisms including certain bacteria and yeasts. Acidic character can be a complex balance of several types of acid and characteristics of age. The evolution of natural acidity develops balanced complexity. Residual flavors that come from liquids previously aged in a barrel such as bourbon or sherry should not be present. Wood vessels may be used during the fermentation and aging process, but wood-derived flavors such as vanillin must not be present. In darker versions, roasted malt, caramel-like and chocolate-like characters should be subtle in both flavor and aroma. American sour may have evident full range of hop aroma and hop bitterness with a full range of body. Estery and fruity-ester characters are evident, sometimes moderate and sometimes intense, yet balanced. Diacetyl and sweet corn-like dimethylsulfide (DMS) should not be perceived. Chill haze, bacteria and yeast-induced haze are allowable at low to medium levels at any temperature. Fruited American-Style Sour Ales will exhibit fruit flavors in harmonious balance with other characters.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): Varies with style
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): Varies with style

8. Wood And Barrel Aged Beer

8A.  Wood and Barrel Aged Pale to Amber Beer

Any classic style or unique experimental beer that has been aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood. This beer is aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and/or other unique wood character but wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood-flavors. Used sherry, rum, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Primary character of the beer style may or may not be apparent. Sour wood-aged beer of any color is outlined in other categories. Fruited or spiced beer that is wood and barrel aged would also be appropriately entered in this category. The brewer should explain the special nature of the beer to allow for accurate judging. Comments could include: type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), type of barrel used (new, port/ whiskey/ wine/ sherry/ other), base beer style or achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3-5.2% (3.75-6.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): 4-18 (8-36 EBC)

8B.  Wood and Barrel Aged Dark Beer

Any classic style or unique experimental style of dark beer can be wood or barrel-aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood. This beer is aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and/or other unique wood character but wood-aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood-flavors. Used sherry, rum, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Primary character of the beer style may or may not be apparent. Sour wood-aged beer of any color is outlined in other categories. Dark fruited or spiced beer would also be appropriately entered in this category. The brewer should explain the special nature of the beer to allow for accurate judging. Comments could include: type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), type of barrel used (new, port/ whiskey/ wine/ sherry/ other), base beer style or achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3-5.2% (3.75-6.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): Above 18 (above 36 EBC)

9. Wood and Barrel Aged Strong Beer

9.  Wood & Barrel Aged Strong Beer

Any strong classic style or unique, experimental style of beer can be wood or barrel-aged for a period of time in a wooden barrel or in contact with wood. This beer is aged with the intention of imparting the particularly unique character of the wood and/or what has previously been in the barrel. New wood character can be characterized as a complex blend of vanillin and unique wood character but wood aged is not necessarily synonymous with imparting wood-flavors. Used sherry, rum, bourbon, scotch, port, wine and other barrels are often used, imparting complexity and uniqueness to beer. Ultimately a balance of flavor, aroma and mouthfeel are sought with the marriage of new beer with wood and/or barrel flavors. Primary character of the beer style may or may not be apparent. Sour wood-aged beer of any color is outlined in other categories. The brewer must explain the special nature of the beer to allow for accurate judging. Comments could include: type of wood used (new or old, oak or other wood type), type of barrel used (new, port/ whiskey/ wine/ sherry/ other), base beer style or achieved character. Beer entries not accompanied by this information will be at a disadvantage during judging.

Original Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): Varies with style
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): Greater than 5.2% (Greater than 6.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): Varies with style
Color SRM (EBC): Varies with style

10. Smoked Beer

10A.  Bamberg-style Marzen Rauchbier

Bamberg-style Rauchbier Märzen should have beechwood smoky characters that range from detectable to prevalent in the aroma and flavor. Smoke character is neither harshly phenolic nor acrid, but rather very smooth, almost rendering a perception of mild sweetness to this style of beer. The beer is generally toasted malty sweet and full-bodied with low to medium-low hop bitterness. Noble-type hop flavor is low but may be perceptible. The aroma should strike a balance between malt, hop, and smoke. Fruity esters, diacetyl, and chill haze should not be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.050-1.060 (12.5-14.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.020 (3-5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 4-4.7% (5.3-5.9%)
Bitterness (IBU): 18 – 25
Color SRM (EBC): 4-15 (8-30 EBC)

10B.  Bamberg-Style Helles Rauchbier

Helles Rauchbier should have beechwood smoky characters that range from detectable to prevalent in the aroma and flavor. Smoke character is not harshly phenolic, but rather very smooth, almost rendering a perception of mild sweetness to this style of beer. This is a medium-bodied, smoke and malt-emphasized beer with malt character often balanced with low levels of yeast produced sulfur compounds (character). This beer should be perceived as having low bitterness. Certain renditions of this beer style approach a perceivable level of hop flavor (note: hop flavor does not imply hop bitterness) and character but it is essentially balanced with malt character to retain its style identity. Helles Rauchbier malt character is reminiscent of freshly and very lightly toasted sweet malted barley. There should not be any caramel character. Color is light straw to golden. Noble-type hop flavor is low but may be perceptible. The aroma should strike a balance between malt, hop, and smoke. Fruity esters, diacetyl, and chill haze should not be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.050 (11-13 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.012 (2-3 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.8-4.4% (4.5-5.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 18 – 25
Color SRM (EBC): 4-5.5 (8-11 EBC)

10C. Bamberg-Style Bock Rauchbier

Bamberg-style Bock Rauchbier should have beechwood smoky characters that range from detectable to prevalent in the aroma and flavor. Smoke character is not harshly phenolic, but rather very smooth, almost rendering a perception of mild sweetness to this style of beer. The Bock beer character should manifest itself as a strong, malty, medium- to full-bodied with moderate hop bitterness that should increase proportionately with the starting gravity. Hop flavor should be low and hop aroma should be very low. Bocks can range in color from deep copper to dark brown. Fruity esters should be minimal. Diacetyl and chill haze should not be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.066-1.074 (16.5-18 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.018-1.024 (4.5-6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5-6% (6-7.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-30
Color SRM (EBC): 20-30 (40-60 EBC)

10D.  Smoked Porter

Smoke porters are chestnut brown to black in color. They can exhibit a mild to assertive smoke character in balance with other beer characters. Black malt character can be perceived in some porters, while others may be absent of strong roast character. Roast barley character should be absent. Medium to full malt sweetness, caramel and chocolate are acceptable along with medium to medium-high hop bitterness. These beers are usually medium to full bodied. Fruity esters are acceptable. Hop flavor and aroma may vary from being negligible to medium in character.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.040-1.050 (10-12.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.014 (1.5-3.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 4.0-7% (5.0-8.7%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-40
Color SRM (EBC): 20+ (40+ EBC)

10E.  Smoke Beer

Any style of beer can be smoked; the goal is to reach a balance between the style’s character and the smoky properties. Type of wood or other sources of smoke should be specified as well as the style the beer is based upon.

Original Gravity (°Plato):
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato):
Alcohol by Weight (Volume):
Bitterness (IBU):
Color SRM (EBC):

11. Pilsener

11A.  German-Style Pilsener

A classic German Pilsener is very light straw or golden in color and well hopped. Perception of hop bitterness is medium to high. Noble-type hop aroma and flavor are moderate and quite obvious. It is a well-attenuated, medium-light bodied beer, but a malty residual sweetness can be perceived in aroma and flavor. Very low levels of sweet corn-like dimethylsulfide (DMS) character are below most beer drinkers’ taste thresholds and are usually not detectable except to the trained or sensitive palate. Other fermentation or hop related sulfur compounds, when perceived at low levels, may be characteristic of this style. Fruity esters and diacetyl should not be perceived. There should be no chill haze. Its head should be dense and rich.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.050
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.012 (1.5-3 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.6-4.2% (4-5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 25-40
Color SRM (EBC): 3-4 (6-8 EBC)

11B.  Bohemian Style Pilsener

Traditional Bohemian Pilseners are medium bodied, and they can be as dark as a light amber color. This style balances moderate bitterness and noble-type hop aroma and flavor with a malty, slightly sweet, medium body. Extremely low levels of diacetyl and low levels of sweet corn-like dimethylsulfide (DMS) character, if perceived, are characteristic of this style and both may accent malt aroma. A toasted-, biscuit-like, bready malt character along with low levels of sulfur compounds may be evident. There should be no chill haze. Its head should be dense and rich.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.056 (11-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.014-1.020 (3.5-5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.2-4% (4-5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 30-45
Color SRM (EBC): 3-7 (6-14 EBC)

11C.  International-Style Pilsener  

International Pilseners are straw/golden in color and are well attenuated. This medium-bodied beer is often brewed with rice, corn, wheat, or other grain or sugar adjuncts making up part of the mash. Hop bitterness is low to medium. Hop flavor and aroma are low. Residual malt sweetness is low–it does not predominate but may be perceived. Fruity esters and diacetyl should not be perceived. Very low levels of sweet corn-like dimethylsulfide (DMS) character, if perceived, are acceptable. There should be no chill haze.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.050 (11-12.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.010 (2-2.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.6-4.2% (4.5-5.3%)
Bitterness (IBU): 17-30
Color SRM (EBC): 3-4 (6-8 EBC)

12. European Lager

12A.  Muchner-Style Helles

This beer should be perceived as having low bitterness. It is a medium-bodied, malt-emphasized beer with malt character often balanced with low levels of yeast produced sulfur compounds (character). Certain renditions of this beer style approach a perceivable level of hop flavor (note: hop flavor does not imply hop bitterness) and character but it is essentially balanced with malt character to retain its style identity. Malt character is sometimes bread-like yet always reminiscent of freshly and very lightly toasted malted barley. There should not be any caramel character. Color is light straw to golden. Fruity esters and diacetyl should not be perceived. There should be no chill haze.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.050 (11-12.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.050 (11-12.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.8-4.4% (4.5-5.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 18-25
Color SRM (EBC): 4-5.5 (8-11 EBC)

12B.  Dortmunder/European-Style Export

Dortmunder has medium hop bitterness. Hop flavor and aroma from noble hops are perceptible but low. Sweet malt flavor can be low and should not be caramel-like. The color of this style is straw to deep golden. The body will be medium bodied. Fruity esters, chill haze, and diacetyl should not be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.048-1.056 (12-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.010-1.014 (2.5-3.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 4-4.8% (5-6%)
Bitterness (IBU): 23-29
Color SRM (EBC): 3-6 (6-12 EBC)

13. American-Style Lager

13A.  American-Style Lager

Light in body and very light to straw in color, American lagers are very clean and crisp and aggressively carbonated. Flavor components should b e subtle and complex, with no one ingredient dominating the others. Malt sweetness is light to mild. Corn, rice, or other grain or sugar adjuncts are often used. Hop bitterness, flavor and aroma are negligible to very light. Light fruity esters are acceptable. Chill haze and diacetyl should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.040-1.046 (10-11.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): .006-1.010 (1.5-2.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.2-4.0% (3.8-5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 5 – 13
Color SRM (EBC): 2-4 (4-8 EBC)

13B.  American-Style Light Lager

These beers are extremely light colored, light in body, and high in carbonation. Calorie level should not exceed 125 per 12 ounce serving. Corn, rice, or other grain or sugar adjuncts are often used. Flavor is mild and hop bitterness and aroma is negligible to very low. Light fruity esters are acceptable. Chill haze and diacetyl should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.024-1.040 (6-10 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.002-1.008 (0.5-2 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2.8-3.5% (3.5-4.4%)
Bitterness (IBU): 5 – 10
Color SRM (EBC): 1.5-4 (3-8 EBC)

13C. American-Style Premium Lager

This style has low malt (and adjunct) sweetness, is medium bodied, and should contain no or a low percentage (less than 25%) of adjuncts. Color may be light straw to golden. Alcohol content and bitterness may also be greater. Hop aroma and flavor is low or negligible. Light fruity esters are acceptable. Chill haze and diacetyl should be absent.

Note: Some beers marketed as “premium” (based on price) may not fit this definition.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.048 (11-12 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.010-1.014 (2.5-3.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.6-4% (4.3-5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 6 – 15
Color SRM (EBC): 2-6 (4-12 EBC)

13D.  American-Style Pilsner

This classic and unique pre-Prohibition American-style Pilsener is straw to deep gold in color. Hop bitterness, flavor and aroma are medium to high, and use of noble-type hops for flavor and aroma is preferred. Up to 25 percent corn and/or rice in the grist should be used. Malt flavor and aroma are medium. This is a light-medium to medium-bodied beer. Sweet corn-like dimethylsulfide (DMS), fruity esters and citrus flavors or aromas should not be perceived. Diacetyl is not acceptable. There should be no chill haze. Competition organizers may wish to subcategorize this style into rice and corn subcategories.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.045-1.060 (11.3-15 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.018 (3-4.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.9-4.7% (5-6%)
Bitterness (IBU): 25-40
Color SRM (EBC): 3-6 (6-12 EBC)

13E. American-Style Ice Lager

This style is slightly higher in alcohol than most other light-colored, American-style lagers. Its body is low to medium and has low residual malt sweetness. It has few or no adjuncts. Color is very pale to golden. Hop bitterness is low but certainly perceptible. Hop aroma and flavor are low. Chill haze, fruity esters, and diacetyl should not be perceived. Typically these beers are chilled before filtration so that ice crystals (which may or may not be removed) are formed. This can contribute to a higher alcohol content (up to 0.5% more).

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.040-1.060 (10-15 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.014 (1.5-3.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.8-5% (4.6-6%)
Bitterness (IBU): 7 – 20
Color SRM (EBC): 2-8 (4-16 EBC)

13F. American-Style Malt Liquor

High in starting gravity and alcoholic strength, this style is somewhat diverse. Some American malt liquors are just slightly stronger than American lagers, while others approach bock strength. Some residual sweetness is perceived. Hop rates are very low, contributing little bitterness and virtually no hop aroma or flavor. Perception of sweet-fruity esters and complex alcohols (though not solvent-like) are acceptable at low levels. Chill haze and diacetyl should not be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.050-1.060 (12.5-14.7 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.004-1.010 (1-2.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5-6% (6.25-7.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 12 – 23
Color SRM (EBC): 2-5 (4-10 EBC)

14. Amber Lager

14A. Vienna-Style Lager

Beers in this category are reddish brown or copper colored. They are medium in body. The beer is characterized by malty aroma and slight malt sweetness. The malt aroma and flavor should have a notable degree of toasted and/or slightly roasted malt character. Hop bitterness is clean and crisp. Noble-type hop aromas and flavors should be low or mild. Diacetyl, chill haze and ale-like fruity esters should not be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.046-1.056 (11.5 -13.8 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.018 (3-4.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.8-4.3% (4.8-5.4%)
Bitterness (IBU): 22-28
Color SRM (EBC): 12-16 (24-32 EBC)

14B. German-Style Marzen

Märzens are characterized by a medium body and broad range of color. They can range from golden to reddish orange. Sweet maltiness should dominate slightly over a clean hop bitterness. Malt character should be light-toasted rather than strongly caramel (though a low level of light caramel character is acceptable). Bread or biscuit-like malt character is acceptable in aroma and flavor. Hop aroma and flavor should be low but notable. Ale-like fruity esters should not be perceived. Diacetyl and chill haze should not be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.050-1.060 (12.5-14.7 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.020 (3-5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 4-4.7% (5.3-5.9%)
Bitterness (IBU): 18-25
Color SRM (EBC): 4-15 (8-30 EBC)

14C.  German-Style Oktoberfest

Today’s Oktoberfest beers are characterized by a medium body and light, golden color. Sweet maltiness is mild with an equalizing balance of clean, hop bitterness. Hop aroma and flavor should be low but notable. Ale-like fruity esters should not be perceived. Diacetyl and chill haze should not be perceived. Similar or equal to Dortmunder/European-Style Export

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.048-1.056 (12-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.010-1.014 (2.5-3.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 4-4.8% (5-6%)
Bitterness (IBU): 23-29
Color SRM (EBC): 3-5 (6-10 EBC)

14D.  American-Style Amber Lager

American-style amber lagers are light amber to amber or copper colored. They are medium bodied. There is a noticeable degree of caramel-type malt character in flavor and often in aroma. This is a broad category in which the hop bitterness, flavor, and aroma may be accentuated or may only be present at relatively low levels, yet noticeable. Fruity esters, diacetyl, and chill haze should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.042-1.056 (10.5-13.8 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.010-1.018 (2.5-4.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.8-4.3% (4.8-5.4%)
Bitterness (IBU): 18-30
Color SRM (EBC): 6-14 (12-28 EBC)

14E. California Common Beer

California Common Beer is light amber to amber in color and is medium bodied. There is a noticeable degree of caramel-type malt character in flavor and often in aroma. Hop bitterness impression is medium to medium high and is balanced with a low to medium-low degree of fruity esters and malt character and give an impression of balance and drinkability. Hop flavor and aroma is low to medium-low. California Common Beer is a style of beer brewed with lager yeasts but at ale fermentation temperatures. Diacetyl and chill haze should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.045-1.056 (11.2-13.8 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.010-1.018 (2.5-4.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.6-4.5% (4-5.4%)
Bitterness (IBU): 35-45
Color SRM (EBC): 8-15 (24-34 EBC)

15. Dark Lager

15A. European-Style Dark/Muncher Dunkel

These light brown to dark brown beers have a pronounced malty aroma and flavor that dominates over the clean, crisp, moderate hop bitterness. This beer does not offer an overly sweet impression, but rather a mild balance between malt sweetness, hop bitterness and light to moderate mouthfeel. A classic Münchner dunkel should have a chocolate-like, roast malt, bread-like or biscuit-like aroma that comes from the use of Munich dark malt. Chocolate or roast malts can be used, but the percentage used should be minimal. Noble-type hop flavor and aroma should be low but perceptible. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Ale-like fruity esters and chill haze should not be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.048-1.056 (12-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.014-1.018 (3.5-4.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.8-4.2% (4.5-5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 15-25
Color SRM (EBC): 15-20 (30-40 EBC)

15B. German-Style Schwarzbier

These very dark brown to black beers have a mild roasted malt character without the associated bitterness. This is not a fullbodied beer, but rather a moderate body gently enhances malt flavor and aroma with low to moderate levels of sweetness. Hop bitterness is low to medium in character. Noble-type hop flavor and aroma should be low but perceptible. There should be no fruity esters. Diacetyl should not be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.052 (11-13 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.010-1.016 (2.5-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3-3.9% (3.8-5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 22-30
Color SRM (EBC): 25-30 (50-60 EBC)

15C. American-Style Dark Lager

This beer’s malt aroma and flavor are low but notable. Its color ranges from a very deep copper to a deep, dark brown. It has a clean, light body with discreet contributions from caramel and roasted malts. Non-malt adjuncts are often used, and hop rates are low. Hop bitterness is clean and has a short duration of impact. Hop flavor, and aroma are low. Carbonation is high. Fruity esters, diacetyl, and chill haze should not be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.040-1.050 (10-12.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.012 (2-3 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.2-4.4% (4-5.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 14-20
Color SRM (EBC): 14-25 (28-50 EBC)

16. German-Style Bock

16A. Traditional German-Style Bock

Traditional bocks are made with all malt and are strong, malty, medium- to full-bodied, bottom-fermented beers with moderate hop bitterness that should increase proportionately with the starting gravity. Malt character should be a balance of sweetness and toasted/nut-like malt; not caramel. Hop flavor should be low and hop aroma should be very low. Bocks can range in color from deep copper to dark brown. Fruity esters should be minimal. Diacetyl should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.066-1.074 (16.5-18 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.018-1.024 (4.5-6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5-6% (6.3-7.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-30
Color SRM (EBC): 20-30 (40-60 EBC)

16B. German-Style Heller Bock/Maibock

The German word helle means light colored, and as such, a heller Bock is light straw to deep golden in color. Maibocks are also light-colored bocks. The sweet malty character should come through in the aroma and flavor. A lightly toasted and/or bready malt character is often evident. Roast or heavy toast/caramel malt character should be absent. Body is medium to full. Hop bitterness should be low, while noble-type hop aroma and flavor may be at low to medium levels. Bitterness increases with gravity. Fruity esters may be perceived at low levels. Diacetyl should be absent. Chill haze should not be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.066-1.074 (16.5-18 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.020 (3-5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5-6.4% (6-8%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-38
Color SRM (EBC): 4-10 (8-20 EBC)

16C. German-Style Doppelbock

Malty sweetness is dominant but should not be cloying. Malt character is more reminiscent of fresh and lightly toasted Munichstyle malt, more so than caramel or toffee malt character. Some elements of caramel and toffee can be evident and contribute to complexity, but the predominant malt character is an expression of toasted barley malt. Doppelbocks are full bodied and deep amber to dark brown in color. Astringency from roast malts is absent. Alcoholic strength is high, and hop rates increase with gravity. Hop bitterness and flavor should be low and hop aroma absent. Fruity esters are commonly perceived but at low to moderate levels. Diacetyl should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.074-1.080 (18 –19.3 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.014-1.020 (3.5-5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5.2-6.2% (6.5-8%)
Bitterness (IBU): 17-27
Color SRM (EBC): 12-30 (24-60 EBC)

16D. German-Style Eisbock

A stronger version of Doppelbock. Malt character can be very sweet. The body is very full and deep copper to almost black in color. Alcoholic strength is very high. Hop bitterness is subdued. Hop flavor and aroma are absent. Fruity esters may be evident but not overpowering. Typically these beers are brewed by freezing a Doppelbock and removing resulting ice to increase alcohol content. Diacetyl should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.074-1.116 (18-27.2 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): N/A Alcohol
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 6.8-11.3% (8.6-14.4%)
Bitterness (IBU): 26-33
Color SRM (EBC): 18-50 (36-100 EBC

17. Golden or Blonde Beer

17A. American-Style Cream Ale of Lager

Mild, pale, light-bodied ale, made using a warm fermentation (top or bottom) and cold lagering. Hop bitterness and flavor range from very low to low. Hop aroma is often absent. Sometimes referred to as cream ales, these beers are crisp and refreshing. Pale malt character predominates. Caramelized malt character should be absent. A fruity or estery aroma may be perceived. Diacetyl and chill haze should not be perceived. Sulfur character and/or sweet corn-like dimethylsulfide (DMS) should be extremely low or absent from this style of beer.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.052 (11-13 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.004-1.010 (1-2.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.4-4.5% (4.2-5.6%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 22
Color SRM (EBC): 2-5 (4-10 EBC)

17B. Golden or Blonde Ale

Golden or Blonde ales are straw to golden blonde in color. They have a crisp, dry palate, light to medium body, and light malt sweetness. Low to medium hop aroma may be present but does not dominate. Bitterness is low to medium. Fruity esters may be perceived but do not predominate. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Chill haze should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.045-1.056 (11-13.8 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.016 (2-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.2-4% (4-5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 15-25
Color SRM (EBC): 3-7 (6-14 EBC)

18. English-Style Pale Ale

18A. Classic English-Style Pale Ale

Classic English pale ales are golden to copper colored and display earthy, herbal English-variety hop character. Note that ―earthy, herbal English-variety hop character‖ is the perceived end, but may be a result of the skillful use of hops of other national origins. Medium to high hop bitterness, flavor, and aroma should be evident. This medium-bodied pale ale has low to medium malt flavor and aroma. Low caramel character is allowable. Fruity-ester flavors and aromas are moderate to strong. Chill haze may be in evidence only at very cold temperatures. The absence of diacetyl is desirable, though, diacetyl (butterscotch character) is acceptable and characteristic when at very low levels.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.040-1.056 (10-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.016 (2-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.5-4.2% (4.5-5.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-40
Color SRM (EBC): 5 – 14 (10-28 EBC)

18B. English-Style India Pale Ale

Most traditional interpretations of English-style India pale ales are characterized by medium-high hop bitterness with a medium to medium-high alcohol content. Hops from a variety of origins may be used to contribute to a high hopping rate. Earthy and herbal English-variety hop character is the perceived end, but may be a result of the skillful use of hops of other national origins. The use of water with high mineral content results in a crisp, dry beer, sometimes with subtle and balanced character of sulfur compounds. This pale gold to deep copper-colored ale has a medium to high, flowery hop aroma and may have a medium to strong hop flavor (in addition to the hop bitterness). English-style India pale ales possess medium maltiness and body. Fruity-ester flavors and aromas are moderate to very strong. Diacetyl can be absent or may be perceived at very low levels. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Hops of other origins may be used for bitterness or approximating traditional English character.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.050-1.064 (12.5-15.7 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.018 (3-4.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 4-5.6% (5-7%)
Bitterness (IBU): 35-63
Color SRM (EBC): 6-14 (12-28 EBC)

18C. English-Style Summer Ale

English Summer Ale is light straw to golden colored with medium-low to medium bitterness, light to medium-light body, and low to medium residual malt sweetness. Torrefied and/or malted wheat are often used in quantities of 25% or less. Malt flavor may be biscuit-like. English, American or Noble-type hop, character, flavor and aroma are evident and may or may not be assertive yet always well balanced with malt character. Mild carbonation traditionally characterizes draft-cask versions. In bottled versions, normal or lively carbon dioxide content is appropriate. The overall impression is refreshing and thirst quenching. Fruity-ester characters are acceptable at low to moderate levels. No butterscotch-like diacetyl or sweet corn-like dimethylsulfide (DMS) should be apparent in aroma or flavor. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.036-1.050 (9-12.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.012 (1.5-3 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2.9-4% (3.6-5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-30
Color SRM (EBC): 4-7 (8-14 EBC)

18D. English-Style Pale Mild

English pale mild ales range from golden to amber in color. Malt flavor dominates the flavor profile with little hop bitterness or flavor. Hop aroma can be light. Very low diacetyl flavors may be appropriate in this low-alcohol beer.  Fruity-ester level is very low. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.030-1.036 (7.5-9 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.004-1.008 (1-2 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2.7-3.2% (3.2-4.0%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 20
Color SRM (EBC): 8-17 (16-34 EBC)

19. American-Style Pale Ale

19A. American-Style Pale Ale

American pale ales range from deep golden to copper in color. The style is characterized by fruity, floral and citrus-like American-variety hop character producing medium to medium-high hop bitterness, flavor, and aroma. Note that the “traditional” style of this beer has its origins with certain floral, fruity and citrus-like American hop varietals. One or more of these hop characters is the perceived end, but may be a result of the skillful use of hops of other national origins. American pale ales have medium body and low to medium maltiness. Low caramel character is allowable. Fruity-ester flavor and aroma should be moderate to strong. Diacetyl should be absent or present at very low levels. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.050 (11-12.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.014 (2-3.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.5-4.3% (4.5-5.6%)
Bitterness (IBU): 30-42
Color SRM (EBC): 6-14 (12-28 EBC)

19B. American-Style Strong Pale Ale

American strong pale ales range from deep golden to copper in color. The style is characterized by floral and citrus-like American-variety hops used to produce high hop bitterness, flavor, and aroma. Note that ―floral and citrus-like American-variety hop character‖ is the perceived end, but may be a result of the skillful use of hops of other national origins. American strong pale ales have medium body and low to medium maltiness. Low caramel character is allowable. Fruity-ester flavor and aroma should be moderate to strong. Diacetyl should be absent or present at very low levels. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.050-1.060 (12.5-14.7 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.016 (2-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 4.4-5% (5.5-6.3%)
Bitterness (IBU): 40-50
Color SRM (EBC): 6-14 (12-28 EBC)

20. American-Style India Pale Ale

20. American-Style India Pale Ale

American-style India pale ales are perceived to have medium-high to intense hop bitterness, flavor and aroma with medium-high alcohol content. The style is further characterized by fruity, floral and citrus-like American-variety hop character. Note that fruity, floral and citrus-like American-variety hop character is the perceived end, but may be a result of the skillful use of hops of other national origins. The use of water with high mineral content results in a crisp, dry beer. This pale gold to deep copper-colored ale has a full, flowery hop aroma and may have a strong hop flavor (in addition to the perception of hop bitterness). India pale ales possess medium maltiness which contributes to a medium body. Fruity-ester flavors and aromas are moderate to very strong. Diacetyl can be absent or may be perceived at very low levels. Chill and/or hop haze is allowable at cold temperatures. (English and citrus-like American hops are considered enough of a distinction justifying separate American-style IPA and English-style IPA categories or subcategories. Hops of other origins may be used for bitterness or approximating traditional American or English character. See English-style India Pale Ale.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.060-1.075 (14.7-18.2 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.018 (3-4.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5-6% (6.3-7.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 50-70
Color SRM (EBC): 6-14 (12-28 EBC)

21. American-Style India Black Ale

21. American-Style India Black Ale

American-style Black Ale is perceived to have medium high to high hop bitterness, flavor and aroma with medium-high alcohol content, balanced with a medium body. Fruity, floral and herbal character from hops of all origins may contribute character. The style is further characterized by a moderate degree of caramel malt character and dark roasted malt flavor and aroma. High astringency and high degree of burnt roast malt character should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.056-1.075 (14-18.2 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.018 (3-4.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5-6% (6 -7.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 50-70
Color SRM (EBC): 35+ (70+ EBC)

22. Imperial India Pale Ale

22. Imperial India Pale Ale

Imperial or Double India Pale Ales have intense hop bitterness, flavor and aroma. Alcohol content is medium-high to high and notably evident. They range from deep golden to medium copper in color. The style may use any variety of hops. Though the hop character is intense it’s balanced with complex alcohol flavors, moderate to high fruity esters and medium to high malt character. Hop character shuld be fresh and lively and should not be harsh in quality. The use of large amounts of hops may cause a degree of appropriate hop haze. Imperial or Double India Pale Ales have medium-high to full body. Diacetyl should not be perceived. The intention of this style of beer is to exhibit the fresh and bright character of hops. Oxidative character and aged character should not be present.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.075-1.100 (18.2-23.7 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.020 (3-5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 6.0-8.4% (7.5-10.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 65-100
Color SRM (EBC): 5-13 (10-26 EBC)

23. American-Style Amber/Red Ale

23. American-Style Amber/Red Ale

American amber/red ales range from light copper to light brown in color. They are characterized by American-variety hops used to produce the perception of medium hop bitterness, flavor, and medium aroma. Amber ales have medium-high to high maltiness with medium to low caramel character. They should have medium to medium-high body. The style may have low levels of fruityester flavor and aroma. Diacetyl can be either absent or barely perceived at very low levels. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Slight yeast haze is acceptable for bottle-conditioned products.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.048-1.058 (12-14.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.018 (3-4.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.5-4.8% (4.5-6%)
Bitterness (IBU): 30 – 40
Color SRM (EBC): 11-18 (22-36 EBC)

24. Imperial Red Ale

24. Imperial Red Ale

Imperial or Double Red Ales have intense hop bitterness, flavor and aroma. Alcohol content is also very high and of notable character. They range from deep amber to dark copper in color and may exhibit a small amount of chill haze at cold temperatures The style may use any variety of hops. Though the hop character is intense it’s balanced with complex alcohol flavors, moderate to high fruity esters and medium to high caramel malt character. Imperial or Double Red Ales have a full body. Diacetyl should not be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.080-1.100 (19.3-23.7 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.020-1.028 (5-7 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 6.3-8.4% (7.9-10.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 55-85
Color SRM (EBC): 10-15 (20-30 EBC)

25. Bitter

25A.  Ordinary Bitter

Ordinary bitter is gold to copper colored with medium bitterness, light to medium body, and low to medium residual malt sweetness. Hop flavor and aroma character may be evident at the brewer’s discretion. Mild carbonation traditionally characterizes draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions, a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. Fruity-ester character and very low diacetyl (butterscotch) character are acceptable in aroma and flavor, but should be minimized in this form of bitter. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. (English and American hop character may be specified in subcategories.)

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.033-1.038 (8.2-9.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.012 (1.5-3 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2.4-3.3% (3-4.1%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-35
Color SRM (EBC): 5-12 (10-24 EBC)

25B.  Special/Best Bitter

Special bitter is more robust than ordinary bitter. It has medium body and medium residual malt sweetness. It is deep gold to copper colored. Hop bitterness should be medium and absent of harshness. Hop flavor and aroma character may be evident at the brewer’s discretion. Mild carbonation traditionally characterizes draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions, a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. Fruity-ester character is acceptable in aroma and flavor. Diacetyl (butterscotch character) is acceptable and characteristic when at very low levels. The absence of diacetyl is also acceptable. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. (English and American hop character may be specified in subcategories.)

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.038-1.045 (9.5-11.2 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.012 (1.5-3 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.3-3.8% (4.1-4.8%)
Bitterness (IBU): 28-40
Color SRM (EBC): 6-14 (12-28 EBC)

25C. Extra Special Bitter

Extra special bitter possesses medium to strong hop aroma, flavor, and bitterness. The residual malt and defining sweetness of this richly flavored, full-bodied bitter is more pronounced than in other styles of bitter. It is light amber to copper colored with medium to medium-high bitterness. Mild carbonation traditionally characterizes draft-cask versions, but in bottled versions, a slight increase in carbon dioxide content is acceptable. Fruity-ester character is acceptable in aroma and flavor. Diacetyl (butterscotch character) is acceptable and characteristic when at very low levels. The absence of diacetyl is also acceptable. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. English or American hops may be used. (English and American hop character may be specified in subcategories.)

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.046-1.060 (11.5-14.7 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.010-1.016 (2.5-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.8-4.6% (4.8-5.8%)
Bitterness (IBU): 30-45
Color SRM (EBC): 8-14 (16-28 EBC)

26. Scottish-Style Ale

26A. Scottish-Style Light Ale

Scottish light ales are light bodied. Little bitterness is perceived, and hop flavor or aroma should not be perceived. Despite its lightness, Scottish light ale will have a degree of malty, caramel-like, soft and chewy character. Yeast characters such as diacetyl (butterscotch) and sulfuriness are acceptable at very low levels. The color will range from golden amber to deep brown Bottled versions of this traditional draft beer may contain higher amounts of carbon dioxide than is typical for mildly carbonated draft versions. Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures. Though there is little evidence suggesting that traditionally made Scottish-style light ales exhibited peat smoke character, the current marketplace offers many Scottish-style light ales with peat or smoke character present at low to medium levels. Thus a peaty/smoky character may be evident at low levels (ales with medium or higher smoke character would be considered a smoke flavored beer and considered in another category). Scottish-style light ales may be split into two subcategories: Traditional (no smoke character) and Peated (low level of peat smoke character).

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.030-1.035 (7.5-8.8 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.012 (1.5-3 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2.2-2.8% (2.8-3.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 9 – 20
Color SRM (EBC): 8-17 (16-34 EBC)

26B. Scottish-Style Heavy Ale

Scottish heavy ale is moderate in strength and dominated by a smooth, sweet maltiness balanced with low, but perceptible, hop bitterness. Hop flavor or aroma should not be perceived. Scottish heavy ale will have a medium degree of malty, caramel-like, soft and chewy character in flavor and mouthfeel. It has medium body, and fruity esters are very low, if evident. Yeast characters such as diacetyl (butterscotch) and sulfuriness are acceptable at very low levels. The color will range from golden amber to deep brown. Bottled versions of this traditional draft beer may contain higher amounts of carbon dioxide than is typical for mildly carbonated draft versions. Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures. Though there is little evidence suggesting that traditionally made Scottish-style heavy ales exhibited peat smoke character, the current marketplace offers many Scottish-style heavy ales with peat or smoke character present at low to medium levels. Thus a peaty/smoky character may be evident at low levels (ales with medium or higher smoke character would be considered a smoke flavored beer and considered in another category). Scottish-style heavy ales may be split into two subcategories: Traditional (no smoke character) and Peated (low level of peat smoke character).

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.035-1.040 (8.8-10 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.010-1.014 (2.5-3.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2.8-3.2% (3.5-4%)
Bitterness (IBU): 12 – 20
Color SRM (EBC): 10-19 (20-38 EBC)

26C. Scottish-Style Export

The overriding character of Scottish export ale is sweet, caramel-like, and malty. Its bitterness is perceived as low to medium. Hop flavor or aroma should not be perceived. It has medium body. Fruity-ester character may be apparent. Yeast characters such as diacetyl (butterscotch) and sulfuriness are acceptable at very low levels. The color will range from golden amber to deep brown. Bottled versions of this traditional draft beer may contain higher amounts of carbon dioxide than is typical for mildly carbonated draft versions. Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures. Though there is little evidence suggesting that traditionally made Scottish-style export ales exhibited peat smoke character, the current marketplace offers many Scottish-style export ales with peat or smoke character present at low to medium levels. Thus a peaty/smoky character may be evident at low levels (ales with medium or higher smoke character would be considered a smoke flavored beer and considered in another category). Scottish-style export ales may be split into two subcategories: Traditional (no smoke character) and Peated (low level of peat smoke character).

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.040-1.050 (10-12.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.010-1.018 (2.5-4.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.2-4.2% (4.0-5.3%)
Bitterness (IBU): 15-25
Color SRM (EBC): 10-19 (20-38 EBC)

27. Irish-Style Red Ale

27. Irish-Style Red Ale

Irish-style red ales range from light red-amber-copper to light brown in color. These ales have a medium hop bitterness and flavor. They often don’t have hop aroma. Irish-style red ales have low to medium candy-like caramel sweetness and a medium body. The style may have low levels of fruity-ester flavor and aroma. Diacetyl should be absent or at very low levels. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Slight yeast haze is acceptable for bottle-conditioned products.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.040-1.048 (10-12 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.010-1.014 (2.5-3.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.2-3.6% (4-4.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-28
Color SRM (EBC): 11-18 (22-36 EBC)

28. English-Style Brown Ale

28A. English Style Dark Mild

English dark mild ales range from deep copper to dark brown (often with a red tint) in color. Malt flavor and caramel are part of the flavor and aroma profile while, licorice and roast malt tones may sometimes contribute to the flavor and aroma profile. Body should be low-medium to medium. These beers have very little hop flavor or aroma. Very low diacetyl flavors may be appropriate in this low-alcohol beer. Fruity-ester level is very low.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.030-1.036 (7.5-9 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.004-1.008 (1-2 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2.7-3.2% (3.2-4.0%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 24
Color SRM (EBC): 17-34 (34-68 EBC)

28B. English Style Brown Ale

English brown ales range from deep copper to brown in color. They have a medium body and a dry to sweet maltiness with very little hop flavor or aroma. Roast malt tones may sometimes contribute to the flavor and aroma profile. Low to medium-low levels of fruity-ester flavors are appropriate. Diacetyl should be very low, if evident. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.040-1.050 (10-12.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.014 (2-3.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.3-4.7% (4-5.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 15-25
Color SRM (EBC): 15-25 (30-50 EBC)

29. American-Style Brown Ale

29. American-Style Brown Ale

American brown ales range from deep copper to brown in color. Roasted malt caramel-like and chocolate-like characters should be of medium intensity in both flavor and aroma. American brown ales have evident low to medium hop flavor and aroma, medium to high hop bitterness, and a medium body. Estery and fruity-ester characters should be subdued. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.040-1.060 (10-14.7 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.010-1.018 (2.5-4.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.3-5.0% (4-6.4%)
Bitterness (IBU): 25-45
Color SRM (EBC): 15-26 (30-52 EBC)

30. German-Style Ale

30A. German-Style Kolsch

Kölsch is warm fermented and aged at cold temperatures (German ale or alt-style beer). Kölsch is characterized by a golden to straw color and a slightly dry, subtly sweet softness on the palate, yet crisp. Good, dense head retention is desirable. A light fruitiness may be apparent, but is not necessary for this style. Caramel character should not be evident. The body is light to medium-light. This beer has low hop flavor and aroma with medium bitterness. Wheat can be used in brewing this beer. Ale yeast is used for fermentation, though lager yeast is sometimes used in the bottle or final cold conditioning process. Fruity esters should be minimally perceived, if at all. Chill haze should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.042-1.048 (10.5-12 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.010 (1.5-2.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.8-4.2% (4.8-5.3%)
Bitterness (IBU): 18-25
Color SRM (EBC): 4-6 (8-12 EBC)

30B. German-Style Alt

Copper to brown in color, this German ale may be highly hopped and intensely bitter (although the 25 to 35 IBU range is more normal for the majority of Altbiers from Düsseldorf) and has a medium body and malty flavor. A variety of malts, including wheat, may be used. Hop character may be low to medium in the flavor and aroma. The overall impression is clean, crisp, and flavorful often with a dry finish. Fruity esters can be low. No diacetyl or chill haze should be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.052 (11-13 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.014 (2-3.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.6-4.4% (4.3-5.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 25-52
Color SRM (EBC): 11-19 (22-38 EBC)

31. German-Style Weiss

31A. South German-Style Hefeweizen

The aroma and flavor of a Weissbier with yeast is decidedly fruity and phenolic. The phenolic characteristics are often described as clove- or nutmeg-like and can be smoky or even vanilla-like. Banana-like esters should be present at low to medium-high levels. These beers are made with at least 50 percent malted wheat, and hop rates are quite low. Hop flavor and aroma are absent or present at very low levels. Weissbier is well attenuated and very highly carbonated and a medium to full bodied beer. The color is very pale to pale amber. Because yeast is present, the beer will have yeast flavor and a characteristically fuller mouthfeel and may be appropriately very cloudy. No diacetyl should be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.047-1.056 (11.8-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.016 (2-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.9-4.4% (4.9-5.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 15
Color SRM (EBC): 3-9 (6-18 EBC)

31B. South German-Style Dunkel Weizen

This beer style is characterized by a distinct sweet maltiness and a chocolate-like character from roasted malt. Estery and phenolic elements of this Weissbier should be evident but subdued. Color can range from copper-brown to dark brown. Dunkel Weissbier is well attenuated and very highly carbonated, and hop bitterness is low. Hop flavor and aroma are absent. Usually dark barley malts are used in conjunction with dark cara or color malts, and the percentage of wheat malt is at least 50 percent. If this is served with yeast, the beer may be appropriately very cloudy. No diacetyl should be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.048-1.056 (12-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.016 (2-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.8-4.3% (4.8-5.4%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 15
Color SRM (EBC): 10-19 (20-38 EBC)

31C. South German-Style Kristal Weizen

The aroma and flavor of a Weissbier without yeast is very similar to Weissbier with yeast (Hefeweizen/Hefeweissbier) with the caveat that fruity and phenolic characters are not combined with the yeasty flavor and fuller-bodied mouthfeel of yeast. The phenolic characteristics are often described as clove- or nutmeg-like and can be smoky or even vanilla-like. Banana-like esters are often present. These beers are made with at least 50 percent malted wheat, and hop rates are quite low. Hop flavor and aroma are absent. Weissbier is well attenuated and very highly carbonated, yet its relatively high starting gravity and alcohol content make it a medium- to full-bodied beer. The color is very pale to deep golden. Because the beer has been filtered, yeast is not present. The beer will have no flavor of yeast and a cleaner, drier mouthfeel. The beer should be clear with no chill haze present. No diacetyl should be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.047-1.056 (11.8-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.016 (2-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.9-4.4% (4.9-5.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 15
Color SRM (EBC): 3-9 (6-18 EBC)

31D. South German-Style Weizenbock

This style can be either pale or dark (golden to dark brown in color) and has a high starting gravity and alcohol content. The malty sweetness of a Weizenbock is balanced with a clove-like phenolic and fruity-estery banana element to produce a well-rounded aroma and flavor. As is true with all German wheat beers, hop bitterness is low and carbonation is high. Hop flavor and aroma are absent. It has a medium to full body. If dark, a mild roast malt character should emerge in flavor and to a lesser degree in the aroma. If this is served with yeast the beer may be appropriately very cloudy. No diacetyl should be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.066-1.080 (16-19.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.016-1.028 (4-7 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5.5-7.5% (6.9-9.3%)
Bitterness (IBU): 15-35
Color SRM (EBC): 4.5-30 (9-60 EBC

31E. Berliner-Style Weisse

This is very pale in color and the lightest of all the German wheat beers. The unique combination of yeast and lactic acid bacteria fermentation yields a beer that is acidic, highly attenuated, and very light bodied. The carbonation of a Berliner Weisse is high, and hop rates are very low. Clarity may be hazy or cloudy from yeast or chill haze. Hop character should not be perceived. Fruity esters will be evident. No diacetyl should be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.028-1.032 (7-8 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.004-1.006 (1-1.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2.2-2.7% (2.8-3.4%)
Bitterness (IBU): 3 – 6
Color SRM (EBC): 2-4 (4-8 EBC)

31F. Leipzig-Style Gose

Traditional examples of Gose are spontaneously fermented, similarly to Belgian-style gueuze/lambic beers, and should exhibit complexity of acidic, flavor and aroma contributed by introduction of wild yeast and bacteria into the fermentation. A primary difference between Belgian Gueuze and German Gose is that Gose is served at a much younger age. Gose is typically pale gold to pale amber in color and . typically contains malted barley, unmalted wheat with some traditional varieties containing oats. Hop character and malt flavors and aromas are negligible. Lemony or other citrus-like qualities are often present in aroma and on the palate. Some versions may have the spicy character of added coriander in aroma and on the palate at low to medium levels. Salt (table salt) character is also traditional in low amounts. Horsey, leathery, earthy aroma and flavors contributed by Brettanomyces yeasts may be evident but have a very low profile, as this beer is not excessively aged. Modern German Gose breweries typically introduce only pure beer yeast strains for fermentation. Low to medium lactic acid character is evident in all examples as sharp, refreshing sourness. Gose is typically enjoyed fresh, carbonated, and cloudy/hazy with yeast character, and may have evidence of continued fermentation activity. Overall complexity of flavors and aromas are sought while maintaining an ideal balance between acidity, yeast-enhanced spice and refreshment is ideal.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.036-1.056 (9-13.8 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.012 (2-3 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.5-4.3% (4.4-5.4%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 15
Color SRM (EBC): 3-9 (6-18 EBC)

31G. Bamberg-Style Weiss

Bamberg-style Weiss Rauchbier should have smoky characters that range from detectable to prevalent in the aroma and flavor. Smoke character is not harshly phenolic, but rather very smooth, almost rendering a perception of mild sweetness to this style of beer. The aroma and flavor of a Weissbier with yeast is decidedly fruity and phenolic. The phenolic characteristics are often described as clove- or nutmeg-like and can be smoky or even vanilla-like. Banana-like esters are often present. These beers are made with at least 50 percent malted wheat, and hop rates are quite low. Hop flavor and aroma are absent. Weissbier is well attenuated and very highly carbonated and a medium- to full-bodied beer. The color is very pale to very dark amber. Darker (dunkel) styles should have a detectable degree of roast malt in the balance without being robust in overall character. Because yeast is present, the beer will have yeast flavor and a characteristically fuller mouthfeel and may be appropriately very cloudy. No diacetyl should be perceived.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.047-1.056 (11.8-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.016 (2-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.9-4.4% (4.9-5.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 15
Color SRM (EBC): 4-18 (8-36 EBC)

32. Belgian-Style Wit or White Ale

32. Belgian-Style Wit or White Ale

Belgian white ales are very pale in color and are brewed using unmalted wheat and malted barley and are spiced with coriander and orange peel. Coriander and light orange peel aroma should be perceived as such or as an unidentified spiciness. Phenolic spiciness and yeast flavors may be evident at mild levels. These beers are traditionally bottle conditioned and served cloudy. An unfiltered starch and yeast haze should be part of the appearance. The low to medium body should have some degree of creaminess from wheat starch. The style is further characterized by the use of noble-type hops to achieve low hop bitterness and little to no apparent hop flavor. This beer has no diacetyl and a low to medium fruity-ester level. Mild acidity is appropriate.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.050 (11-12.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.010 (1.5-2.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.8-4.4% (4.8-5.2%)
Bitterness (IBU): 10 – 17
Color SRM (EBC): 2-4 (4-8 EBC)

33. French & Belgian Style Ale

33A. Belgian & French Style Saison

Beers in this category are golden to deep amber in color. There may be quite a variety of characters within this style. Generally: They are light to medium in body. Malt aroma is low to medium-low. Esters dominate the aroma, while hop character, complex alcohols, herbs, spices, low Brettanomyces character and even clove and smoke-like phenolics may or may not be evident in the overall balanced beer. Malt flavor is low but provides foundation for the overall balance. Hop bitterness is moderate to moderately assertive. Herb and/or spice flavors, including black pepper-like notes, may or may not be evident. Fruitiness from fermentation is generally in character. A balanced small amount of sour or acidic flavors is acceptable when in balance with other components. Earthy, cellar-like, musty aromas are okay. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Chill or slight yeast haze is okay. Often bottle conditioned with some yeast character and high carbonation. French & Belgian-Style Saison may have Brettanomyces characters that are slightly acidity, fruity, horsey, goaty and/or leather-like.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.055-1.080 (14-19.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.004-1.016 (1-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.5-6.6% (4.5-8.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-40
Color SRM (EBC): 4-14 (8-28 EBC)

33B. French-Style Biere de Garde

Beers in this category are golden to deep copper or light brown in color. They are light to medium in body. This style of beer is characterized by a toasted malt aroma, slight malt sweetness in flavor, and low to medium hop bitterness. Noble-type hop aromas and flavors should be low to medium. Fruity esters can be light to medium in intensity. Flavor of alcohol is evident. Earthy, cellarlike, musty aromas are okay. Diacetyl should not be perceived but chill haze is okay. Often bottle conditioned with some yeast character. French-Style Biére de Garde may have Brettanomyces characters that are slightly acidity, fruity, horsey, goaty and/or leather-like.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.060-1.080 (15-19.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.024 (3-6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.5-6.3% (4.5-8%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-30
Color SRM (EBC): 8-16 (16-32 EBC)

34. Belgian-Style Pale Ale

34A. Belgian-Style Blonde Ale

Belgian-style blond ales are characterized by low yet evident hop bitterness, flavor, and sometimes aroma. Light to medium body and low malt aroma with a sweet, spiced and a low to medium fruity-ester character orchestrated in flavor and aroma. Sugar may be used to lighten perceived body. They are blonde to golden in color. Noble-type hops are commonly used. Low levels of phenolic spiciness from yeast byproducts may be perceived. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Acidic character should not be present. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.054-1.068 (13.5-16.8 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.014 (2-3.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5.0-6.2% (6.0-7.8%)
Bitterness (IBU): 15-30
Color SRM (EBC): 4-7 (8-14 EBC)

34B. Belgian-Style Pale Ale

Belgian-style pale ales are characterized by low but noticeable hop bitterness, flavor, and aroma. Light to medium body and low malt aroma are typical. They are light amber to deep amber in color. Noble-type hops are commonly used. Low to medium fruity esters are evident in aroma and flavor. Low levels of phenolic spiciness from yeast byproducts may be perceived. Low caramel or toasted malt flavor is okay. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.054 (11-13.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.014 (2-3.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.2-5.0% (4.0-6.0%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-30
Color SRM (EBC): 6-12 (12-24 EBC)

34C. Belgian-Style Table Beer

These ales and lagers are very low in alcohol and historically in Belgium enjoyed with meals by both adults and children. Pale to very dark brown in color. Additions of caramel coloring are sometimes employed to adjust color. They are light bodied with relatively low carbonation with limited aftertaste. The mouth feel is light to moderate, though higher than one might anticipate, usually because of unfermented sugars/malt sugars. Malted barley, wheat and rye may be used as well as unmalted wheat, rye, oats and corn. A mild malt character could be evident. Aroma/Flavor hops are most commonly used to employ a flavor balance that is only low in bitterness. Traditional versions do not use artificial sweeteners nor are they excessively sweet. More modern versions of this beer incorporate sweeteners such as sugar and saccharine added post fermentation to sweeten the palate and add to a perception of smoothness. Spices (such as orange and lemon peel, as well as coriander) may be added in barely perceptible amounts, but this is not common. Diacetyl should not be perceived. Competition directors may choose to break out subcategories of Traditional and Modern.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.038 (2-9.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1004-1.034 (1-8.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 0.4-2.8% (0.5-3.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 5 – 15
Color SRM (EBC): 5-50 (10-100 EBC)

35. Belgian-Style Sour Ale

35A. Belgian-Style Flanders/Oud Bruin or Red Ale

This light- to medium-bodied deep copper to brown ale is characterized by a slight to strong lactic sourness, and with “Reds” sometimes a balanced degree of acetic acid. Brettanomyces produced flavors and aromas are not part of character. A fruity-estery character which is often cherry-like is apparent with no hop flavor or aroma. Flanders brown ales have low to medium bitterness and a cocoa-like character from roast malt. Roasted malt character in aroma and flavor is acceptable at low levels. A very low degree of malt sweetness may be present and in balance with the acidity produced by lactobacillus activity. Oak-like or woody characters may be pleasantly integrated into overall palate. Chill haze is acceptable at low serving temperatures. Some versions may be more highly carbonated and, when bottle conditioned, may appear cloudy (yeast) when served. These final beers are often blended old with new before packaging in order to create the brewer’s intended balance of characters.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.056 (11-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.016 (2-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.8-5.2% (4.8-6.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 15-25
Color SRM (EBC): 12-20 (24-40 EBC)

35B. Belgian-Style Lambic

Unblended, naturally and spontaneously fermented lambic is intensely estery, sour, and sometimes, but not necessarily, acetic flavored. Low in carbon dioxide, these hazy beers are brewed with unmalted wheat and malted barley. Sweet malt characters are not perceived. They are very low in hop bitterness. Cloudiness is acceptable. These beers are quite dry and light bodied. Characteristic horsey, goaty, leathery and phenolic character evolved from Brettanomyces yeast is often present at moderate levels. Versions of this beer made outside of the Brussels area of Belgium cannot be true lambics. These versions are said to be “lambicstyle” and may be made to resemble many of the beers of true origin. Vanillin and other woody flavors should not be evident. Historically, traditional lambic is dry and completely attenuated, exhibiting no residual sweetness either from malt, sugar or artificial sweeteners. Sweet versions may be created through addition of sugars or artificial sweeteners. Competition organizers may choose to subcategorize this style into A) Traditional and B) Sweet. Artificial sweeteners are sometimes used in some brands

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.047-1.056 (11.8-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.000-1.010 (0-2.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5-6.5% (6.2-8.1%)
Bitterness (IBU): 11 – 23
Color SRM (EBC): 6-13 (12-26 EBC)

35C. Belgian-Style Gueuze Lambic

Old lambic is blended with newly fermenting young lambic to create this special style of lambic. Gueuze is always refermented in the bottle. These unflavored blended and secondary fermented lambic beers may be very dry or mildly sweet and are characterized by intense fruity-estery, sour, and acidic aromas and flavors. These pale beers are brewed with unmalted wheat, malted barley, and stale, aged hops. Sweet malt characters are not perceived. They are very low in hop bitterness. Diacetyl should be absent. Characteristic horsey, goaty, leathery and phenolic character evolved from Brettanomyces yeast is often present at moderate levels. Cloudiness is acceptable. These beers are quite dry and light bodied. Vanillin and other woody flavors should not be evident. Versions of this beer made outside of the Brussels area of Belgium cannot be true lambics. These versions are said to be “lambic-style” and may be made to resemble many of the beers of true origin. Historically, traditional gueuze lambics are dry and completely attenuated, exhibiting no residual sweetness either from malt, sugar or artificial sweeteners. Some versions often have a degree of sweetness, contributed by sugars or artificial sweeteners. Competition organizers may choose to subcategorize this style into A) Traditional and B) Sweet. Artificial sweeteners are sometimes used in some brands.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.044-1.056 (11-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.000-1.010 (0-2.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5.5-7% (6.8-8.6%)
Bitterness (IBU): 11 – 23
Color SRM (EBC): 6-13 (12-26 EBC)

35D. Belgian-Style Fruit Lambic

These beers, also known by the names framboise, kriek, peche, cassis, etc., are characterized by fruit flavors and aromas. The color reflects the choice of fruit. Sourness is an important part of the flavor profile, though sweetness may compromise the intensity. These flavored lambic beers may be very dry or mildly sweet and range from a dry to a full-bodied mouthfeel. Characteristic horsey, goaty, leathery and phenolic character evolved from Brettanomyces yeast is often present at moderate levels. Vanillin and other woody flavors should not be evident. Versions of this beer made outside of the Brussels area of Belgium cannot be true lambics. These versions are said to be “lambic-style” and may be made to resemble many of the beers of true origin. Historically, traditional lambics are dry and completely attenuated, exhibiting no residual sweetness either from malt, sugar, fruit or artificial sweeteners. Some versions often have a degree of sweetness, contributed by fruit sugars, other sugars or artificial sweeteners. Competition organizers may choose to subcategorize this style into A) Traditional and B) Sweet. Artificial sweeteners are sometimes used in some brands.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.040-1.072 (10-17.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.016 (2-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 4.5-7% (5.6-8.6%)
Bitterness (IBU): 15-21
Color SRM (EBC): Color takes on hue of fruit.

36. Belgian-Style Dark Ale

36A. Belgian-Style Dubbel

This medium-bodied, red to dark brown colored ale has a malty sweetness and chocolate-like caramel aroma. A light hop flavor and/or aroma is acceptable. Dubbels are also characterized by low-medium to medium bitterness. No diacetyl is acceptable. Yeast generated fruity esters (especially banana) are appropriate at low levels. Head retention is dense and mousse-like. Chill haze is acceptable at low serving temperatures. Often bottle conditioned a slight yeast haze and flavor may be evident.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.060-1.075 (14.7-18.2 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.016 (3-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5-6.0% (6.25-7.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-30
Color SRM (EBC): 16-36 (32-72 EBC)

36B. Belgian-Style Quadrupel

Quadrupels or “Quads” are characterized by the immense presence of alcohol and balanced flavor, bitterness and aromas. Its color is deep amber to rich chestnut/garnet brown. Often characterized by a mousse-like dense, sometimes amber head will top off a properly poured and served quad. Complex fruity aroma and flavor emerge reminiscent of raisins, dates, figs, grapes, plums often accompanied with a hint of winy character. Caramel, dark sugar and malty sweet flavors and aromas can be intense, not cloying, while complementing fruitiness. Though well attenuated it usually has a full, creamy body. Hop characters do not dominate; low to low-medium bitterness is perceived. Perception of alcohol can be extreme. Clove-like phenolic flavor and aroma should not be evident. Chill haze is acceptable at low serving temperatures. Diacetyl and DMS should not be perceived. Well balanced with savoring/sipping drinkability. Oxidative character if evident in aged Quads should be mild and pleasant.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.084-1.120 (20.2-28 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.014-1.020 (3.5-5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 7.2-11.2% (9-14%)
Bitterness (IBU): 25-50
Color SRM (EBC): 8-20 (16-40 EBC)

36C. Belgian-Style Dark Strong Ale

Belgian dark strong ales are amber to dark brown in color. Often, though not always, brewed with dark Belgian “candy” sugar, these beers can be well attenuated, ranging from medium to full-bodied. The perception of hop bitterness is low to medium, with hop flavor and aroma also in this range. Fruity complexity along with the soft flavors of roasted malts add distinct character. The alcohol strength of these beers can often be deceiving to the senses. The intensity of malt character can be rich, creamy, and sweet with intensities ranging from medium to high. Very little or no diacetyl is perceived. Herbs and spices are sometimes used to delicately flavor these strong ales. Low levels of phenolic spiciness from yeast byproducts may also be perceived. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.064-1.096 (16-23 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.024 (3-6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5.6-8.8% (7.0-11.0%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-50
Color SRM (EBC): 9-35 (18-70 EBC)

37. Belgian-Style Pale Strong Ale

37A. Belgian-Style Pale Strong Ale

Belgian pale strong ales are pale to golden in color with relatively light body for a beer of its alcoholic strength. Often brewed with light colored Belgian “candy” sugar, these beers are well attenuated. The perception of hop bitterness is medium-low to medium -high, with hop flavor and aroma also in this range. These beers are highly attenuated and have a perceptively deceiving high alcoholic character—being light to medium bodied rather than full bodied. The intensity of malt character should be low to medium, often surviving along with a complex fruitiness. Very little or no diacetyl is perceived. Herbs and spices are sometimes used to delicately flavor these strong ales. Low levels of phenolic spiciness from yeast byproducts may also be perceived. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.064-1.096 (16-23 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.024 (3-6 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5.6-8.8% (7.0-11.0%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-50
Color SRM (EBC): 3.5-10 (7-20 EBC)

37B. Belgian-Style Tripel

Tripels are often characterized by a complex, sometimes mild spicy character. Clove-like phenolic flavor and aroma may be evident at extremely low levels. Yeast-generated fruitiness, including banana esters, are also common, but not necessary. These pale/light-colored ales may finish sweet, though any sweet finish should be light. The beer is characteristically medium and clean in body with an equalizing hop/malt balance and a perception of medium to medium high hop bitterness. Traditional Belgian Tripels are often well attenuated. Brewing sugar may be used to lighten the perception of body. Its sweetness will come from very pale malts. There should not be character from any roasted or dark malts. Low hop flavor is acceptable. Alcohol strength and flavor should be perceived as evident. Head retention is dense and mousse-like. Chill haze is acceptable at low serving temperatures. Traditional Tripels are bottle conditioned, may exhibit slight yeast haze but the yeast should not be intentionally roused. Oxidative character if evident in aged Tripels should be mild and pleasant.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.070-1.092 (17-22 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.010-1.018 (2.5-4.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5.6-8.0% (7.0-10.0%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-45
Color SRM (EBC): 4-9 (8-18 EBC)

38. Porter

38A. Brown Porter

Brown porters are mid to dark brown (may have red tint) in color. No roast barley or strong burnt/black malt character should be perceived. Low to medium malt sweetness, caramel and chocolate is acceptable along with medium hop bitterness. This is a light to medium-bodied beer. Fruity esters are acceptable. Hop flavor and aroma may vary from being negligible to medium in character.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.040-1.050 (10-12.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.006-1.014 (1.5-3.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.5-4.7% (4.5-6.0%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-30
Color SRM (EBC): 20-35 (40-70 EBC)

38B. Robust Porter

Robust porters are black in color and have a roast malt flavor, often reminiscent of cocoa, but no roast barley flavor. These porters have a sharp bitterness of black malt without a highly burnt/charcoal flavor. Caramel and other malt sweetness should be present and in harmony with other distinguishing porter characters. Robust porters range from medium to full in body and have a malty sweetness. Hop bitterness is medium to high, with hop aroma and flavor ranging from negligible to medium. Diacetyl is acceptable at very low levels. Fruity esters should be evident, balanced with roast malt and hop bitterness.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.045-1.060 (11-14.7 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.016 (2-4 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 4.0-5.2% (5.0-6.5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 25-40
Color SRM (EBC): 30+ (60+ EBC)

38C.  Baltic-Style Porter

A true smooth cold-fermented and cold lagered beer, brewed with lager yeast. Black to very deep ruby/garnet in color. Overall, Baltic Porters have a very smooth lagered character with distinctive caramelized sugars, licorice and chocolate-like character of roasted malts and dark sugars. Roasted dark malts should not contribute bitterness, or astringent roast character. A low degree of smokiness from malt may be evident. Debitterized roast malts are best used for this style. Because of its alcoholic strength, aroma may include gentle (low) lager fruitiness (berries, grapes, plums, not banana; ale-like fruitiness from warm temperature fermentation is not appropriate), complex alcohols, cocoa-like, roast malt (and sometimes coffee-like roast barley, yet not bitter). Hop aroma is very low, though a hint of floral or sweet hop aroma can complement aromatics and flavor without dominance. Baltic Porters are not hop bitter dominated and expressed as low to medium-low. Baltic porters range from having medium to full body complemented with a medium-low to medium level of malty sweetness. No butterscotch-like diacetyl or sweet corn-like dimethylsulfide (DMS) should be apparent in aroma or flavor.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.072-1.085 (17.5-20.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.016-1.022 (4-5.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 6-7.2% (7.5-9%)
Bitterness (IBU): 35-40
Color SRM (EBC): 40+ (80+ EBC)

38D.  American-Style Imperial Porter

Imperial porters are very dark brown to black in color. No roast barley or strong burnt/astringent black malt character should be perceived. Medium malt, caramel and cocoa-like sweetness should be in harmony with medium-low to medium hop bitterness. This is a full bodied beer. Ale-like fruity esters should be evident but not overpowering and compliment malt derived sweetness and hop character. Hop flavor and aroma may vary from being low to medium-high. Diacetyl (butterscotch) levels should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.080-1.100 (19.5-23 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.020-1.030 (4-7.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5.5-9.5% (7-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 35-50
Color SRM (EBC): 40+ (80+ EBC)

39. Specialty Stout

39A. Classic Irish-Style Dry Stout

Dry stouts have an initial malt and light caramel flavor profile with a distinctive dry-roasted bitterness in the finish. Dry stouts achieve a dry-roasted character through the use of roasted barley. The emphasis of coffee-like roasted barley and a moderate degree of roasted malt aromas define much of the character. Some slight acidity may be perceived but is not necessary. European hop aroma and flavor should be low or not perceived. Dry stouts have medium-light to medium body. Fruity esters are minimal and overshadowed by malt, high hop bitterness, and roasted barley character. Diacetyl (butterscotch) should be very low or not perceived. Head retention and rich character should be part of its visual character.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.038-1.048 (9.5-12 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.012 (2-3 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.2-4.2% (3.8-5%)
Bitterness (IBU): 30-40
Color SRM (EBC): 40+ (80+ EBC)

39B. Sweet Stout

Sweet stouts, also referred to as cream stouts, have less roasted bitter flavor and a full-bodied mouthfeel. The style can be given more body with milk sugar (lactose) before bottling. Malt sweetness, chocolate, and caramel flavor should dominate the flavor profile and contribute to the aroma. Hops should balance and suppress some of the sweetness without contributing apparent flavor or aroma. The overall impression should be sweet and full-bodied.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.045-1.056 (11-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.012-1.020 (3-5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 2.5-5% (3-6%)
Bitterness (IBU): 15-25
Color SRM (EBC): 40+ (80+ EBC)

39C. Oatmeal Stout

Oatmeal stouts include oatmeal in their grist, resulting in a pleasant, full flavor and a smooth profile that is rich without being grainy. A roasted malt character which is caramel-like and chocolate-like should be evident — smooth and not bitter. Coffee-like roasted barley and roasted malt aromas (chocolate and nut-like) are prominent. Color is dark brown to black. Bitterness is moderate, not high. Hop flavor and aroma are optional but should not overpower the overall balance if present. This is a medium- to full bodied beer, with minimal fruity esters. Diacetyl should be absent or at extremely low levels. Original gravity range and alcohol levels are indicative of English tradition of oatmeal stout.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.038-1.056 (9.5-14 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.020 (2-5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 3.0-4.8% (3.8-6%)
Bitterness (IBU): 20-40
Color SRM (EBC): 20+ (40+ EBC)

40. Bold Stout

40A. Foreign (Export)-Style Stout

As with classic dry stouts, foreign-style stouts have an initial malt sweetness and caramel flavor with a distinctive dry-roasted bitterness in the finish. Coffee-like roasted barley and roasted malt aromas are prominent. Some slight acidity is permissible and a medium- to full-bodied mouthfeel is appropriate. Bitterness may be high but the perception is often compromised by malt sweetness. Hop aroma and flavor should not be perceived. The perception of fruity esters is low. Diacetyl (butterscotch) should be negligible or not perceived. Head retention is excellent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.052-1.072 (13-17.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.008-1.020 (2-5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 4.5-7.5% (5.7-9.3%)
Bitterness (IBU): 30-60
Color SRM (EBC): 40+ (80+ EBC)

40B. American-Style Stout

Initial low to medium malt sweetness with a degree of caramel, chocolate and/or roasted coffee flavor with a distinctive dry roasted bitterness in the finish. Coffee-like roasted barley and roasted malt aromas are prominent. Some slight roasted malt acidity is permissible and a medium- to full-bodied mouthfeel is appropriate. Hop bitterness may be moderate to high. Hop aroma and flavor is moderate to high, often with American citrus-type and/or resiny hop character. The perception of fruity esters is low. Roasted malt/barley astringency may be low but not excessive. Diacetyl (butterscotch) should be negligible or not perceived. Head retention is excellent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.050-1.075 (12.4-18.2°Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.010-1.022 (2.5-5.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 4.5-7% (5.7-8.8%)
Bitterness (IBU): 35-60
Color SRM (EBC): 40+ (80+ EBC)

41. Imperial Stout

41A. English-Style Imperial Stout

Dark copper to very dark brown, British-style imperial stouts typically have high alcohol content. The extremely rich malty flavor (often characterized as toffee-like or caramel-like) and aroma are balanced with medium hopping and high fruity-ester characteristics. Bitterness should be moderate and balanced with sweet malt character. The bitterness may be higher in the darker versions. Roasted malt astringency is very low or absent. Bitterness should not overwhelm the overall character. Hop aroma can be subtle to moderately hop-floral, -citrus or -herbal. Diacetyl (butterscotch) levels should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.080-1.100 (19.5-23 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.020-1.030 (4-7.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5.5-9.5% (7-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 45-65
Color SRM (EBC): 20-40+ (40-80+ EBC)

41B. American-Style Imperial Stout

Black in color. American-style imperial stouts typically have a high alcohol content. Generally characterized as very robust. The extremely rich malty flavor and aroma are balanced with assertive hopping and fruity-ester characteristics. Bitterness should be moderately high to very high and balanced with full sweet malt character . Roasted malt astringency and bitterness can be moderately perceived but should not overwhelm the overall character. Hop aroma is usually moderately-high to overwhelmingly hop-floral, -citrus or -herbal. Diacetyl (butterscotch) levels should be absent.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.080-1.100 (19.5-23 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.020-1.030 (4-7.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5.5-9.5% (7-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 50-80
Color SRM (EBC): 40+ (80+ EBC)

42. British-Style Strong Ale

42A. Old Ale

Dark amber to brown in color, old ales are medium to full bodied with a malty sweetness. Hop aroma should be minimal and flavor can vary from none to medium in character intensity. Fruity-ester flavors and aromas can contribute to the character of this ale. Bitterness should be minimal but evident and balanced with malt and/or caramel-like sweetness. Alcohol types can be varied and complex. A distinctive quality of these ales is that they undergo an aging process (often for years) on their yeast either in bulk storage or through conditioning in the bottle, which contributes to a rich, wine-like and often sweet oxidation character. Complex estery characters may also emerge. Some very low diacetyl character may be evident and acceptable. Wood aged characters such as vanillin and other woody characters are acceptable. Horsey, goaty, leathery and phenolic character evolved from Brettanomyces organisms and acidity may be present but should be at low levels and balanced with other flavors Residual flavors that come from liquids previously aged in a barrel such as bourbon or sherry should not be present. Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures. (This style may often be split into two categories, strong and very strong. Brettanomyces organisms and acidic characters reflect historical character. Competition organizers may choose to distinguish these types of old ale from modern versions.)

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.058-1.088 (14.3-21 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.014-1.030 (3.5-7.5 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5-7.2% (6-9%)
Bitterness (IBU): 30-65
Color SRM (EBC): 12-30 (24-60 EBC)

42B. Strong Ale

Light amber to mid-range brown in color, strong ales are medium to full bodied with a malty sweetness and may have low levels of roast malt character. Hop aroma should be minimal and flavor can vary from none to medium in character intensity. Fruity-ester flavors and aromas can contribute to the character of this ale. Bitterness should be minimal but evident and balanced with malt and/or caramel-like sweetness. Alcohol types can be varied and complex. A rich, often sweet and complex estery character may be evident. Very low levels of diacetyl are acceptable. Chill haze is acceptable at low temperatures. (This style may often be split into two categories, strong and very strong.)

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.060-1.125 (15-31.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.014-1.040 (3.5-10 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5.5-8.9% (7-11%)
Bitterness (IBU): 30-65
Color SRM (EBC): 8-21 (16-42 EBC)

42C. Scotch Ale

Scotch ales are overwhelmingly malty and full-bodied. Perception of hop bitterness is very low. Hop flavor and aroma are very low or nonexistent. Color ranges from deep copper to brown. The clean alcohol flavor balances the rich and dominant sweet maltiness in flavor and aroma. A caramel character is often a part of the profile. Dark roasted malt flavors and aroma may be evident at low levels. If present, fruity esters are generally at low aromatic and flavor levels. Low diacetyl levels are acceptable. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures. Though there is little evidence suggesting that traditionally made strong Scotch ales exhibited peat smoke character, the current marketplace offers many Scotch Ales with peat or smoke character present at low to medium levels. Thus a peaty/smoky character may be evident at low levels (ales with medium or higher smoke character would be considered a smoke flavored beer and considered in another category).

Scotch Ales may be split into two subcategories: Traditional (no smoke character) and Peated (low level of peat smoke character).

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.072-1.085 (17.5-20.5 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.016-1.028 (4-7 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 5.2-6.7% (6.2-8%)
Bitterness (IBU): 25-35
Color SRM (EBC): 15-30 (30-60 EBC)

43. Barley Wine

43A. English-Style Barley Wine

British-style barley wines range from tawny copper to dark brown in color and have a full body and high residual malty sweetness. Complexity of alcohols and fruity-ester characters are often high and counterbalanced by the perception of low to medium bitterness and extraordinary alcohol content. Hop aroma and flavor may be minimal to medium. English type hops are often used but not necessary for this style. Low levels of diacetyl may be acceptable. Caramel and some characters indicating oxidation, such as vinous (sometimes sherry-like) aromas and/or flavors, may be considered positive. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.085-1.120 (20.4-28 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.024-1.028 (6-7 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 6.7-9.6% (8.4-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 40-60
Color SRM (EBC): 14-22 (28-44 EBC)

43B. American-Style Barley Wine

American style barley wines range from amber to deep copper-garnet in color and have a full body and high residual malty sweetness. Complexity of alcohols and fruity-ester characters are often high and counterbalanced by assertive bitterness and extraordinary alcohol content. Hop aroma and flavor are at medium to very high levels. American type hops are often used but not necessary for this style. Very low levels of diacetyl may be acceptable. A caramel and/or toffee aroma and flavor are often part of the character. Characters indicating oxidation, such as vinous (sometimes sherry-like) aromas and/or flavors, are not generally acceptable in American-style Barley Wine Ale, however if a low level of age-induced oxidation character harmonizes and enhances the overall experience this can be regarded favorably. Chill haze is allowable at cold temperatures.

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.090-1.120 (21.6-28 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.024-1.028 (6-7 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 6.7-9.6% (8.4-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 60-100
Color SRM (EBC): 11-22 (22-44 EBC)

43C. American-Style Wheat Wine

American style wheat wines range from gold to deep amber and are brewed with 50% or more wheat malt. They have full body and high residual malty sweetness. Perception of bitterness is moderate to medium -high. Fruity-ester characters are often high and counterbalanced by complexity of alcohols and high alcohol content. Hop aroma and flavor are at low to medium levels. Very low levels of diacetyl may be acceptable. Bready, wheat, honey-like and/or caramel aroma and flavor are often part of the character. Phenolic yeast character, sulfur, and/or sweet corn-like dimethylsulfide (DMS) should not be present. Oxidized, stale and aged characters are not typical of this style. Chill haze is allowable

Original Gravity (°Plato): 1.088-1.120 (21-28 °Plato)
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity (°Plato): 1.024-1.032 (6-8 °Plato)
Alcohol by Weight (Volume): 6.7-9.6% (8.4-12%)
Bitterness (IBU): 45-85
Color SRM (EBC): SRM (EBC) 8-15 (16-30 EBC)


Mead: Division 1408

For all Meads use the following descriptions to specify:

  • Carbonation level: still, petillant or sparkling
  • Sweetness: dry, semi-sweet, or sweet
  • Strength: hydromel, standard, or sack
44. Traditional Mead

44A.  Dry Mead

Must specify carbonation level and strength.

Aroma: Honey aroma may be subtle, although not always identifiable. Sweetness or significant honey aromatics should not be expected. If a honey variety is declared, the variety should be distinctive (if noticeable). Different types of honey have different intensities and characters. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Appearance: Standard description applies.

Flavor: Subtle (if any) honey character, and may feature subtle to noticeable varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). No to minimal residual sweetness with a dry finish. Sulfury, harsh or yeasty fermentation characteristics are undesirable. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Mouthfeel: Standard description applies, although the body is generally light to medium. Note that stronger meads will have a fuller body. Sensations of body should not be accompanied by noticeable residual sweetness.

Overall Impression: Similar in balance, body, finish and flavor intensity to a dry white wine, with a pleasant mixture of subtle honey character, soft fruity esters, and clean alcohol. Complexity, harmony, and balance of sensory elements are most desirable, with no inconsistencies in color, aroma, flavor or aftertaste. The proper balance of sweetness, acidity, alcohol and honey character is the essential final measure of any mead.

Ingredients: Standard description applies. Traditional Meads feature the character of a blended honey or a blend of honeys. Varietal meads feature the distinctive character of certain honeys. “”Show meads”” feature no additives, but this distinction is usually not obvious to judges.

44B. Semi-Sweet Mead

Must specify carbonation level and strength.

Aroma: Honey aroma should be noticeable, and can have a light sweetness that may express the aroma of flower nectar. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Appearance: Standard description applies.

Flavor: Subtle to moderate honey character, and may feature subtle to noticeable varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). Subtle to moderate residual sweetness with a medium-dry finish. Sulfury, harsh or yeasty fermentation characteristics are undesirable. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Mouthfeel: Standard description applies, although the body is generally medium-light to medium-full. Note that stronger meads will have a fuller body. Sensations of body should not be accompanied by a residual sweetness that is higher than moderate.

Overall Impression: Similar in balance, body, finish and flavor intensity to a semisweet (or medium-dry) white wine, with a pleasant mixture of honey character, light sweetness, soft fruity esters, and clean alcohol. Complexity, harmony, and balance of sensory elements are most desirable, with no inconsistencies in color, aroma, flavor or aftertaste. The proper balance of sweetness, acidity, alcohol and honey character is the essential final measure of any mead.

Ingredients: Standard description applies. Traditional Meads feature the character of a blended honey or a blend of honeys. Varietal meads feature the distinctive character of certain honeys. “”Show meads”” feature no additives, but this distinction is usually not obvious to judges.

44C. Sweet Mead

Must specify carbonation level and strength.

Aroma: Honey aroma should dominate, and is often moderately to strongly sweet and usually expresses the aroma of flower nectar. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Appearance: Standard description applies.

Flavor: Moderate to significant honey character, and may feature moderate to prominent varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). Moderate to high residual sweetness with a sweet and full (but not cloying) finish. Sulfury, harsh or yeasty fermentation characteristics are undesirable. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Mouthfeel: Standard description applies, although the body is generally medium-full to full. Note that stronger meads will have a fuller body. Many seem like a dessert wine. Sensations of body should not be accompanied by cloying, raw residual sweetness.

Overall Impression: Similar in balance, body, finish and flavor intensity to a well-made dessert wine (such as Sauternes), with a pleasant mixture of honey character, residual sweetness, soft fruity esters, and clean alcohol. Complexity, harmony, and balance of sensory elements are most desirable, with no inconsistencies in color, aroma, flavor or aftertaste. The proper balance of sweetness, acidity, alcohol and honey character is the essential final measure of any mead.

Ingredients: Standard description applies. Traditional Meads feature the character of a blended honey or a blend of honeys. Varietal meads feature the distinctive character of certain honeys. “”Show meads”” feature no additives, but this distinction is usually not obvious to judges.

45. Melomel (Fruit Mead)

45A. Cyser (Apple Melomel)

Must specify carbonation level, strength and sweetness.

Aroma: Depending on the sweetness and strength, a subtle to distinctly identifiable honey and apple/cider character (dry and/or hydromel versions will tend to have lower aromatics than sweet and/or sack versions). The apple/cider character should be clean and distinctive; it can express a range of apple-based character ranging from a subtle fruitiness to a single varietal apple character (if declared) to a complex blend of apple aromatics. Some spicy or earthy notes may be present, as may a slightly sulfury character. The honey aroma should be noticeable, and can have a light to significant sweetness that may express the aroma of flower nectar. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). The bouquet should show a pleasant fermentation character, with clean and fresh aromatics being preferred. Stronger and/or sweeter versions will have higher alcohol and sweetness in the nose. Slight spicy phenolics from certain apple varieties are acceptable, as is a light diacetyl character from malolactic fermentation (both are optional). Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Appearance: Standard description applies, except with regard to color. Color may range from pale straw to deep golden amber (most are yellow to gold), depending on the variety of honey and blend of apples or ciders used.

Flavor: The apple and honey flavor intensity may vary from none to high; the residual sweetness may vary from none to high; and the finish may range from dry to sweet, depending on what sweetness level has been declared (dry to sweet) and strength level has been declared (hydromel to sack). Natural acidity and tannin in apples may give some tartness and astringency to balance the sweetness, honey flavor and alcohol. A cyser may have a subtle to strong honey character, and may feature noticeable to prominent varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). Slight spicy phenolics from certain apple varieties are acceptable, as are a light diacetyl character from malolactic fermentation and a slight sulfur character (all are optional). Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Mouthfeel: Standard description applies. Often wine-like. Some natural acidity is usually present (from the blend of apples) and helps balance the overall impression. Some apples can provide natural astringency, but this character should not be excessive.

Overall Impression: In well-made examples of the style, the fruit is both distinctive and well-incorporated into the honeysweet- acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. Some of the best strong examples have the taste and aroma of an aged Calvados (apple brandy from northern France), while subtle, dry versions can taste similar to many fine white wines.

Ingredients: Standard description applies. Cyser is a standard mead made with the addition of apples or apple juice. Traditionally, cysers are made by the addition of honey to apple juice without additional water. A spiced cyser, or a cyser with other ingredients, should be entered as an Open Category Mead.

45B. Pyment (Grape Melomel)

Must specify carbonation level, strength and sweetness.

Aroma: Depending on the sweetness and strength, a subtle to distinctly identifiable honey and grape/wine character (dry and/or hydromel versions will tend to have lower aromatics than sweet and/or sack versions). The grape/wine character should be clean and distinctive; it can express a range of grape-based character ranging from a subtle fruitiness to a single varietal grape character (if declared) to a complex blend of grape or wine aromatics. Some complex, spicy, grassy or earthy notes may be present (as in wine). The honey aroma should be noticeable, and can have a light to significant sweetness that may express the aroma of flower nectar. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). The bouquet should show a pleasant fermentation character, with clean and fresh aromatics being preferred. Stronger and/or sweeter versions will have higher alcohol and sweetness in the nose. Slight spicy phenolics from certain red grape varieties are acceptable, as is a light diacetyl character from malolactic fermentation in certain white grape varieties (both are optional). Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Appearance: Standard description applies, except with regard to color. Color may range from pale straw to deep purple-red, depending on the variety of grapes and honey used. The color should be characteristic of the variety or type of grape used, although white grape varieties may also take on color derived from the honey variety.

Flavor: The grape/wine and honey flavor intensity may vary from subtle to high; the residual sweetness may vary from none to high; and the finish may range from dry to sweet, depending on what sweetness level has been declared (dry to sweet) and strength level has been declared (hydromel to sack). Natural acidity and tannin in grapes may give some tartness and astringency to balance the sweetness, honey flavor and alcohol. A pyment may have a subtle to strong honey character, and may feature noticeable to prominent varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). Depending on the grape variety, some fruity, spicy, grassy, buttery, earthy, minerally, and/or floral flavors may be present. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Mouthfeel: Standard description applies. Wine-like. Some natural acidity is usually present (from grapes) and helps balance the overall impression. Grape tannin and/or grape skins can add body as well as some astringency, although this character should not be excessive. Longer aging can smooth out tannin-based astringency.

Overall Impression: In well-made examples of the style, the grape is both distinctively vinous and well-incorporated into the honey-sweet-acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. White and red versions can be quite different, and the overall impression should be characteristic of the type of grapes used and suggestive of a similar variety wine.

Ingredients: Standard description applies. A pyment is a standard mead made with the addition of grapes or grape juices. Alternatively, the pyment may be a homemade grapebased wine sweetened with honey, or a mead mixed with homemade grape-based wine after fermentation. A spiced pyment (hippocras), or a pyment with other ingredients should be entered as an Open Category Mead.

45C. Other Fruit Melomel

Must specify carbonation level, strength and sweetness.

Aroma: Depending on the sweetness and strength, a subtle to distinctly identifiable honey and fruit character (dry and/or hydromel versions will tend to have lower aromatics than sweet and/or sack versions). The fruit character should display distinctive aromatics associated with the particular fruit(s); however, note that some fruit (e.g., raspberries, cherries) have stronger aromas and are more distinctive than others (e.g., blueberries, strawberries)—allow for a range of fruit character and intensity from subtle to aggressive. The fruit character should be pleasant and supportive, not artificial and inappropriately overpowering (considering the character of the fruit). In a blended fruit melomel, not all fruit may be individually identifiable or of equal intensity. The honey aroma should be noticeable, and can have a light to significant sweetness that may express the aroma of flower nectar. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). The bouquet should show a pleasant fermentation character, with clean and fresh aromatics being preferred. Stronger and/or sweeter versions will have higher alcohol and sweetness in the nose. Some tartness may be present if naturally occurring in the particular fruit(s), but should not be inappropriately intense. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Appearance: Standard description applies, except with regard to color. Color may take on a very wide range of colors, depending on the variety of fruit and/or honey used. For lightercolored melomels with fruits that exhibit distinctive colors, the color should be noticeable. Note that the color of fruit in mead is often lighter than the flesh of the fruit itself and may take on slightly different shades. Meads made with lighter color fruits can also take on color from varietal honeys. In meads that produce a head, the head can take on some of the fruit color as well.

Flavor: The fruit and honey flavor intensity may vary from subtle to high; the residual sweetness may vary from none to high; and the finish may range from dry to sweet, depending on what sweetness level has been declared (dry to sweet) and strength level has been declared (hydromel to sack). Natural acidity and tannin in some fruit and fruit skin may give sometartness and astringency to balance the sweetness, honey flavor and alcohol. A melomel may have a subtle to strong honey character, and may feature noticeable to prominent varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). The distinctive flavor character associated with the particular fruit(s) should be noticeable, and may range in intensity from subtle to aggressive. The balance of fruit with the underlying mead is vital, and the fruit character should not be artificial and/or inappropriately overpowering. In a blended fruit melomel, not all fruit may be individually identifiable or of equal intensity. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Mouthfeel: Standard description applies. Most will be winelike. Some natural acidity and/or astringency are sometimes present (from certain fruit and/or fruit skin) and helps balance the overall impression. Fruit tannin can add body as well as some astringency. High levels of astringency are undesirable. The acidity and astringency levels should be somewhat reflective of the fruit used.

Overall Impression: In well-made examples of the style, the fruit is both distinctive and well-incorporated into the honeysweet- acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. Different types of fruit can result in widely different characteristics; allow for a variation in the final product.

Ingredients: Standard description applies. A melomel is a standard mead made with the addition of other fruit or fruit juices. There should be an appealing blend of the fruit and honey character but not necessarily an even balance. A melomel can be made with a blend of fruits; however, a melomel that is spiced or that contains other ingredients should be entered as an Open Category Mead. Melomels made with either apples or grapes should be entered as Cysers and Pyments, respectively.

46. Other Mead

46A. Metheglin

Must specify carbonation level, strength and sweetness.

Aroma: Depending on the sweetness and strength, a subtle to distinctly identifiable honey and herb/spice character (dry and/or hydromel versions will tend to have lower aromatics than sweet and/or sack versions). The herb/spice character should display distinctive aromatics associated with the particular herbs/spices; however, note that some herbs/spices (e.g., ginger, cinnamon) have stronger aromas and are more distinctive than others (e.g., chamomile, lavender)—allow for a range of herb/spice character and intensity from subtle to aggressive. The herb/spice character should be pleasant and supportive, not artificial and inappropriately overpowering (considering the character of the herb/spice). In a blended herb/spice metheglin, not all herbs/spices may be individually identifiable or of equal intensity. The honey aroma should be noticeable, and can have a light to significant sweetness that may express the aroma of flower nectar. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). The bouquet should show a pleasant fermentation character, with clean and fresh aromatics being preferred. Stronger and/or sweeter versions will have higher alcohol and sweetness in the nose. Some herbs and spices may produce spicy or peppery phenolics. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Appearance: Standard description applies, except perhaps to note that the color usually won’t be affected by spices and herbs (although flowers, petals and peppers may provide subtle colors; tea blends may provide significant colors).

Flavor: The herb/spice flavor intensity may vary from subtle to high; the honey flavor intensity may vary from subtle to high; the residual sweetness may vary from none to high; and the finish may range from dry to sweet, depending on what sweetness level has been declared (dry to sweet) and strength level has been declared (hydromel to sack). The distinctive flavor character associated with the particular herbs/spices may range in intensity from subtle to aggressive (although some herbs/spices may not be individually recognizable, and can just serve to add a background complexity). Certain herbs and spices might add bitter, astringent, phenolic or spicy (hot) flavors; if present, these qualities should be related to the declared ingredients (otherwise, they are faults), and they should balance and blend with the honey, sweetness and alcohol. Metheglins containing more than one herb/spice should have a good balance among the different herbs/spices, though some herbs/spices will tend to dominate the flavor profile. A metheglin may have a subtle to strong honey character, and may feature noticeable to prominent varietal character if a varietal honey is declared (different varieties have different intensities). Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Mouthfeel: Standard description applies. Some herbs or spices may contain tannins that add a bit of body and some astringency, but this character should not be excessive.

Overall Impression: In well-made examples of the style, the herbs/spices are both distinctive and well-incorporated into the honey-sweet-acid-tannin-alcohol balance of the mead. Different types of herbs/spices can result in widely different characteristics; allow for a variation in the final product.

Ingredients: Standard description applies. A metheglin is a standard mead made with the addition of spices or herbs. Meads made with flowers (such as rose petal mead, or rhodomel), chocolate, coffee, nuts or chile peppers (capsimel/ capsicumel) may also be entered in this category, as can meads made with a blend of spices. If spices are used in conjunction with other ingredients such as fruit, cider, or other fermentables, then the mead should be entered as an Open Category Mead.

46B. Braggot

Must specify carbonation level, strength and sweetness.

Aroma: Depending on the sweetness, strength and base style of beer, a subtle to distinctly identifiable honey and beer character (dry and/or hydromel versions will tend to have lower aromatics than sweet and/or sack versions). The honey and beer/malt character should be complementary and balanced, although not always evenly balanced. If a variety of honey is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable varietal character reflective of the honey (different varieties have different intensities and characters). If a base style of beer or type of malt is declared, the aroma might have a subtle to very noticeable character reflective of the beer style (different styles and malts have different intensities and characters). A hop aroma (any variety or intensity) is optional; if present, it should blend harmoniously with the other elements. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Appearance: Standard description does not apply due to beerlike characteristics. Clarity may be good to brilliant, although many braggots are not as clear as other meads. A light to moderate head with some retention is expected. Color may range from light straw to dark brown or black, depending on the variety of malt and honey used. The color should be characteristic of the declared beer style and/or honey used, if a variety is declared. Stronger versions may show signs of body (e.g., legs).

Flavor: Displays a balanced character identifiable as both a beer and a mead, although the relative intensity of flavors is greatly affected by the sweetness, strength, base style of beer, and variety of honey used. If a beer style is declared, the braggot should have some character traceable to the style although the flavors will be different due to the presence of honey. If a variety of honey is declared, the braggot should feature a subtle to prominent varietal character (different varieties have different intensities). Stronger and/or sweeter braggots should be expected to have a greater intensity of flavor than drier, lower gravity versions. The finish and aftertaste will vary based on the declared level of sweetness (dry to sweet), and may include both beer and mead components. A wide range of malt characteristics is allowable, from plain base malts to rich caramel and toast flavors to dark chocolate and roast flavors. Hop bitterness and flavor may be present, and may reflectany variety or intensity; however, this optional character should always be both suggestive of the base beer style and well blended with the other flavors. Standard description applies for remainder of characteristics.

Mouthfeel: Standard description does not apply due to beerlike characteristics. Smooth mouthfeel without astringency. Body may vary from moderately light to full, depending on sweetness, strength, and the base style of beer. Note that stronger meads will have a fuller body. A very thin or watery body is undesirable, as is a cloying, raw sweetness. A warming sense of well-aged alcohol may be present in stronger examples. Carbonation will vary as described in the standard description. A still braggot will usually have some level of carbonation (like a cask bitter) since a completely flat beer is unappetizing. However, just as an aged barleywine may be still, some braggots can be totally still.

Overall Impression: A harmonious blend of mead and beer, with the distinctive characteristics of both. A wide range of results are possible, depending on the base style of beer, variety of honey and overall sweetness and strength. Beer flavors tend to somewhat mask typical honey flavors found in other meads.

Ingredients: A braggot is a standard mead made with both honey and malt providing flavor and fermentable extract. Originally, and alternatively, a mixture of mead and ale. A braggot can be made with any type of honey, and any type of base beer style. The malt component may be derived from grain or malt extracts. The beer may be hopped or not. If any other ingredients than honey and beer are contained in the braggot, it should be entered as an Open Category Mead. Smoked braggots may be entered in this category if using smoked malt or a smoked beer as the base style; braggots made using other smoked ingredients (e.g., liquid smoke, chipotles) should be entered in the Open Category Mead style.

46C. Open Category Mead

Must specify carbonation level, strength and sweetness.

An Open Category Mead is a honey-based beverage that either combines ingredients from two or more of the other mead sub-categories, is a historical or indigenous mead (e.g., tej, Polish meads), or is a mead that does not fit into any other category. Any specialty or experimental mead using additional sources of fermentables (e.g., maple syrup, molasses, brown sugar, or agave nectar), additional ingredients (e.g., vegetables, liquors, smoke, etc.), alternative processes (e.g., icing, oak-aging) or other unusual ingredient, process, or technique would also be appropriate in this category. No mead can be “”out of style”” for this category unless it fits into another existing mead category. Aroma, appearance, flavor, mouthfeel generally follow the standard descriptions, yet note that all the characteristics may vary. Since a wide range of entries are possible, note that the characteristics may reflect combinations of the respective elements of the various sub-categories used in this style. Refer to Category 25 for a detailed description of the character of dry, semisweet and sweet mead. If the entered mead is a combination of other existing mead categories, refer to the constituent categories for a detailed description of the character of the component styles.

Overall Impression: This mead should exhibit the character of all of the ingredients in varying degrees, and should show a good blending or balance between the various flavor elements. Whatever ingredients are included, the result should be identifiable as a honey-based fermented beverage.


Ciders: Division 1409

For all Ciders use the following descriptions to specify:

  • Carbonation level: still, petillant or sparkling
  • Sweetness: dry, semi-sweet, or sweet
  • Strength: hydromel, standard, or sack
47. Standard Cider and Perry

47A. Common Cider

Must specify carbonation level and sweetness.

A common cider is made from culinary/table apples, with wild or crab apples often used for acidity/tannin balance.

Aroma/Flavor: Sweet or low-alcohol ciders may have apple aroma and flavor. Dry ciders will be more wine-like with some esters. Sugar and acidity should combine to give a refreshing character, neither cloying nor too austere. Medium to high acidity.

Appearance: Clear to brilliant, pale to medium gold in color.

Mouthfeel: Medium body. Some tannin should be present for slight to moderate astringency, but little bitterness.

Overall Impression: Variable, but should be a medium, refreshing drink. Sweet ciders must not be cloying. Dry ciders must not be too austere. An ideal cider serves well as a “”session”” drink, and suitably accompanies a wide variety of food.

Comments: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (dry, medium, sweet).

Varieties: Common (Winesap, Macintosh, Golden Delicious, Braeburn, Jonathan), multi-use (Northern Spy, Russets, Baldwin), crabapples, any suitable wildings.

Original Gravity: 1.045 – 1.065
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity: 1.000 – 1.020
Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 5 – 8%

47B. English Cider

Must specify carbonation level and sweetness.

This includes the English “West Country” plus ciders inspired by that style. These ciders are made with bittersweet and bitter-sharp apple varieties cultivated specifically for cider making.

Aroma/Flavor: No overt apple character, but various flavors and esters that suggest apples. May have “smoky (bacon)” character from a combination of apple varieties and MLF. Some “Farmyard nose” may be present but must not dominate; mousiness is a serious fault. The common slight farmyard nose of an English West Country cider is the result of lactic acid bacteria, not a Brettanomyces contamination.

Appearance: Slightly cloudy to brilliant. Medium to deep gold color.

Mouthfeel: Full. Moderate to high tannin apparent as astringency and some bitterness. Carbonation still to moderate, never high or gushing.

Overall Impression: Generally dry, full-bodied, austere.

Comments: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still or petillant). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (dry to medium). Entrants MAY specify variety of apple for a single varietal cider; if specified, varietal character will be expected.

Varieties: Kingston Black, Stoke Red, Dabinett, Foxwhelp, Yarlington Mill, various Jerseys, etc.

Original Gravity: 1.050 – 1.075
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity: 0.995 – 1.010
Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 6 – 9%

47C. French Cider

Must specify carbonation level and sweetness.

This includes Normandy styles plus ciders inspired by those styles, including ciders made by various techniques to achieve the French flavor profile. These ciders are made with bittersweet and bittersharp apple varieties cultivated specifically for cider making. Traditional French procedures use small amounts of salt and calcium compounds (calcium chloride, calcium carbonate) to aid the process of pectin coagulation. These compounds may be used, prefermentation, but in limited quantity. It is a fault if judges can detect a salty or chalky taste.

Aroma/Flavor: Fruity character/aroma. This may come from slow or arrested fermentation (in the French technique of défécation) or approximated by back sweetening with juice. Tends to a rich fullness.

Appearance: Clear to brilliant, medium to deep gold color.

Mouthfeel: Medium to full, mouth filling. Moderate tannin apparent mainly as astringency. Carbonation moderate to champagne-like, but at higher levels it must not gush or foam.

Overall Impression: Medium to sweet, full-bodied, rich.

Comments: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (petillant or full). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (medium, sweet). Entrants MAY specify variety of apple for a single varietal cider; if specified, varietal character will be expected.

Varieties: Nehou, Muscadet de Dieppe, Reine des Pommes, Michelin, etc.

Original Gravity: 1.050 – 1.065
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity: 1.010 – 1.020
Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 3 – 6%

47D. Common Perry

Must specify carbonation level and sweetness.

Common perry is made from culinary/table fruit.

Aroma/Flavor: There is a pear character, but not obviously fruity. It tends toward that of a young white wine. No bitterness.

Appearance: Slightly cloudy to clear. Generally quite pale.

Mouthfeel: Relatively full, low to moderate tannin apparent as astringency.Overall Impression: Mild. Medium to medium-sweet. Still to lightly sparkling. Only very slight acetification is acceptable. Mousiness, ropy/oily characters are serious faults.

Comments: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (medium or sweet).

Varieties: Bartlett, Kiefer, Comice, etc.

Original Gravity: 1.050 – 1.060
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity: 1.000 – 1.020
Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 5 – 7%

47E. Traditional Perry

Must specify carbonation level and sweetness.

Traditional perry is made from pears grown specifically for that purpose rather than for eating or cooking. Many “perry pears” are nearly inedible.

Aroma/Flavor: There is a pear character, but not obviously fruity. It tends toward that of a young white wine. Some slight bitterness.

Appearance: Slightly cloudy to clear. Generally quite pale.

Mouthfeel: Relatively full, moderate to high tannin apparent as astringency.

Overall Impression: Tannic. Medium to medium-sweet. Still to lightly sparkling. Only very slight acetification is acceptable. Mousiness, ropy/oily characters are serious faults.

Comments: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (medium or sweet). Variety of pear(s) used must be stated.

Varieties: Butt, Gin, Huffcap, Blakeney Red, etc.

Original Gravity: 1.050 – 1.070
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity: 1.000 – 1.020
Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 5 – 9%

48. Specialty Cider and Perry

48A. New England Cider

Must specify if cider was barrel-fermented or aged.

This is a cider made with characteristic New England apples for relatively high acidity, with adjuncts to raise alcohol levels.

Aroma/Flavor: A dry flavorful cider with robust apple character, strong alcohol, and derivative flavors from sugar adjuncts.

Appearance: Clear to brilliant, pale to medium yellow.

Mouthfeel: Substantial, alcoholic. Moderate tannin.

Overall Impression: Substantial body and character.

Comments: Adjuncts may include white and brown sugars, molasses, small amounts of honey, and raisins. Adjuncts are intended to raise OG well above that which would be achieved by apples alone. This style is sometimes barrel-aged, in which case there will be oak character as with a barrel-aged wine. If the barrel was formerly used to age spirits, some flavor notes from the spirit (e.g., whisky or rum) may also be present, but must be subtle. Entrants MUST specify if the cider was barrel-fermented or aged. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (dry, medium, or sweet).

Varieties: Northern Spy, Roxbury Russet, Golden Russet

Original Gravity: 1.060 – 1.100
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity: 0.995 – 1.010
Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 7 – 13%

48B. Fruit Cider

Must specify type of fruit.

This is a cider with other fruits or fruit-juices added – for example, berry. Note that a “”cider”” made from a combination of apple and pear juice would be entered in this category since it is neither cider nor perry.

Aroma/Flavor: The cider character must be present and must fit with the other fruits. It is a fault if the adjuncts completely dominate; a judge might ask, “”Would this be different if neutral spirits replaced the cider?”” A fruit cider should not be like an alco-pop. Oxidation is a fault.

Appearance: Clear to brilliant. Color appropriate to added fruit, but should not show oxidation characteristics. (For example, berries should give red-to-purple color, not orange.)

Mouthfeel: Substantial. May be significantly tannic depending on fruit added.

Overall Impression: Like a dry wine with complex flavors. The apple character must marry with the added fruit so that neither dominates the other.

Comments: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (dry or medium). Entrants MUST specify what fruit(s) and/or fruit juice(s) were added.

Original Gravity: 1.045 – 1.070
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity: 0.995 – 1.010
Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 5 – 9%

48C. Applewine

Must specify carbonation level and sweetness.

The term for this category is traditional but possibly misleading: it is simply a cider with substantial added sugar to achieve higher alcohol than a common cider.

Aroma/Flavor: Comparable to a Common Cider. Cider character must be distinctive. Very dry to slightly medium.

Appearance: Clear to brilliant, pale to medium-gold. Cloudiness or hazes are inappropriate. Dark colors are not expected unless strongly tannic varieties of fruit were used.

Mouthfeel: Lighter than other ciders, because higher alcohol is derived from addition of sugar rather than juice. Carbonation may range from still to champagne-like.

Overall Impression: Like a dry white wine, balanced, and with low astringency and bitterness.

Comments: Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (dry or medium).

Original Gravity: 1.070 – 1.100
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity: 0.995 – 1.010
Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 9 – 12%

48D. Other Specialty Cider/Perry

Must specify major ingredients.

This is an open-ended category for cider or perry with other adjuncts such that it does not fit any of the categories above. This includes the use of spices and/or other sweeteners. A cider with added honey may be entered here if the cider character remains dominant. Otherwise it should be entered as mead in the cyser sub-category.

Aroma/Flavor: The cider character must always be present, and must fit with adjuncts.

Appearance: Clear to brilliant. Color should be that of a common cider unless adjuncts are expected to contribute color.

Mouthfeel: Average body, may show tannic (astringent) or heavy body as determined by adjuncts.

Comments: Entrants MUST specify all major ingredients and adjuncts. Entrants MUST specify carbonation level (still, petillant, or sparkling). Entrants MUST specify sweetness (dry or medium).

Original Gravity: 1.045 – 1.100
Apparent Extract/Final Gravity: 0.995 – 1.020
Alcohol by Volume (ABV): 5 – 12%